2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

G   |    |  Adventure, Sci-Fi


2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) Poster

After discovering a mysterious artifact buried beneath the lunar surface, mankind sets off on a quest to find its origins with help from intelligent supercomputer HAL 9000.

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  • Keir Dullea in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
  • Keir Dullea in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
  • Keir Dullea in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
  • 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
  • Stanley Kubrick in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
  • "2001: A Space Odyssey" Stanley Kubrick and cast 1968 MGM

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2001: A Space Odyssey and Eyes Wide Shut are just the beginning of Stanley Kubrick's legacy. Are you up to speed on the film icon's style?

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


17 June 2002 | Doylenf
It's a puzzlement...
There are two schools of thought about 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY. One, is that it is the greatest science-fiction epic ever made. This is supported by those who claim to understand the complexities involved and leading up the Star Child ending. The others, like myself, find it as absorbing as watching paint dry on woodwork.

The musical background is glorious, the colors are dazzling, and there's an interesting use of HAL as a villainous computer. Beyond that, there is nothing the least bit interesting about the human characters (trite dialogue and no personality or warmth to any of the individuals), the pace is unbelievably slow (so the intellectually gifted can philosophize on the mysteries of space), and the payoff at the end leaves you either breathless with enlightenment or convinced that you have watched three hours of nothingness.

I had the same letdown feeling when I watched THE CLOCKWORK ORANGE, so your like or dislike of this movie is purely dependent on personal taste. Intellectuals will take the position that you are a mentally challenged clod if you dare disagree with their elevated opinion of the movie--so be aware that this is not conventional story-telling in any sense whatsoever and only for those who admire Stanley Kubrick's way with unlikely cinematic material.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Stanley Kubrick was initially forced by MGM to have Alex North (who had written the score for Kubrick's Spartacus (1960)) compose an original score for this film. Kubrick, however, always intended to use classical music for the film. He allowed North to score the first half of the film before informing him they planned to use only sound effects for the second half. It wasn't until he was watching the film at its premier in New York that North discovered that his music had not been used. He later reused themes composed for this film in The Shoes of the Fisherman (1968), Shanks (1974) and Dragonslayer (1981). North's original score was unheard for 25 years until composer Jerry Goldsmith re-recorded it for Varese Sarabande in 1993. In 2007, however, Intrada, working with North's estate, released North's personal copies of the 1968 recording sessions on CD.


Quotes

Aries-1B stewardess: Here you are, sir, main level please.


Goofs

When Dave, then Frank, go outside the Discovery to replace the AE-35 unit, neither one communicates with the other man who remains inside the ship to monitor the operation. In reality, there would be almost constant talk between the two because of the inherent dangers in going EVA.


Crazy Credits

The original theatrical release had Ligeti's Atmospheres to a black screen for roughly 8 to 10 minutes before the movie began, and Strauss' The Blue Danube well after the end credits to a black screen.


Alternate Versions

Some versions have title cards on-screen during the Overture and Entr'acte sections, while other versions omit these titles and simply play the music over a black screen.


Soundtracks

Adventures
(1962) (uncredited)
Music by
György Ligeti
Performed by The International Chamber Ensemble Darmstadt
Conductor Bruno Maderna

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Adventure | Sci-Fi

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