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2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

G   |    |  Adventure, Sci-Fi


2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) Poster

After discovering a mysterious artifact buried beneath the lunar surface, mankind sets off on a quest to find its origins with help from intelligent supercomputer HAL 9000.

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Photos

  • Stanely Kubrick, producer and director of "2001: A Space Odyssey," MGM 1968.
  • Daniel Richter in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
  • Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
  • Keir Dullea and Gary Lockwood in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
  • 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
  • Keir Dullea in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

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Director's Trademarks: A Guide to Stanley Kubrick's Films

2001: A Space Odyssey and Eyes Wide Shut are just the beginning of Stanley Kubrick's legacy. Are you up to speed on the film icon's style?

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Cast & Crew

Top Billed Cast



Director:

Stanley Kubrick

Writers:

Stanley Kubrick (screenplay), Arthur C. Clarke (screenplay)

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The scene on board the spacecraft taking Dr. Floyd to the moon in which the flight attendant walks up the side of the ship's interior and appears to be upside down was filmed with a stationary camera bolted to a room set that revolved, so the actress was always on the bottom but it was she, not the set, that appeared to change position. The technique was invented by silent-film comedian Buster Keaton for the final scene of his 1924 film "The Navigator," in which he and his girlfriend (Kathryn McGuire) are rescued from a derelict ship by a submarine that turns over underwater. The same system was used by Fred Astaire for his solo dance to the song "You're All the World to Me" in "Royal Wedding" (1951).


Quotes

Aries-1B stewardess: Here you are, sir, main level please.


Goofs

When Heywood Floyd is talking to his daughter on the picture-phone, she moves slightly out of frame but remains in the shot. Modern cameras can move around to "follow" a person, Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke foresaw this.


Crazy Credits

No opening credits for actors, writers, producer, director, etc. are shown, with the story beginning right after the title. Although by the 1990s it had become quite common for major films to not have opening credits, it was still unusual in 1968.


Alternate Versions

The original theatrical release had György Ligeti's "Atmospheres" set to a black screen for roughly 8 to 10 minutes before the movie began, and Johann Strauss's "The Blue Danube" long after the end credits set to a black screen. This overture and exit music survived the premiere edits mentioned above. For a long while, revivals and all television and cable broadcasts would cut both, starting directly at the beginning of the credits and ending immediately after the end credits, but current revivals in such places as the Film Forum in New York City and cable channels such as the Sundance Channel, Bravo, the Independent Channel, and PBS have been restoring the pre- and post-movie music.


Soundtracks

Happy Birthday to You
(1893) (uncredited)
Written by
Mildred J. Hill and Patty S. Hill
Performed by Alan Gifford and Ann Gillis

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Adventure | Sci-Fi

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