2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

G   |    |  Adventure, Sci-Fi


2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) Poster

After discovering a mysterious artifact buried beneath the Lunar surface, mankind sets off on a quest to find its origins with help from intelligent supercomputer H.A.L. 9000.


8.3/10
590,589

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Director's Trademarks: A Guide to Stanley Kubrick's Films

2001: A Space Odyssey and Eyes Wide Shut are just the beginning of Stanley Kubrick's legacy. Are you up to speed on the film icon's style?

Watch the video

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


16 November 2001 | Cain47
10
| Nietzsche and 2001
I'm always surprised, given that the famous title track of 2001 is called "Also sprach Zarathustra", that nobody (nobody I've read, anyway) has noted the parallels between the movie and Nietzsche's famous work, "Also sprach Zarathustra". The idea of man's rebirth into a star child; an infant form of an indescribably more advanced being, is an explicit part of N.'s "Zarathustra"; there is a prominent passage called "On how a camel becomes a lion, and a lion becomes a child", in which N. describes the first incarnation of the overman as a child, transcending both the ascetic, altruistic side of man (the camel; always asking to bear more weight) and the rapacious, brutish, will-to-power side of man (the lion). The fact that the song plays during the star child sequence can hardly be coincidence. And also, Zarathustra said that "man is a rope tied between beasts and the overman." The structure of the movie fits that description: a brief history of man as beast, until we become truly man by mastering weapons and acquiring reason, then a long sequence about man (the rope, as it were), and then a brief glimpse of the overman. The inscrutability of how these transformations occurred, and the suggestion that an external force caused them, is also Nietzschean; in "Zarathustra", he makes it pretty clear that he doesn't have a clue how people are going to be able to enact these changes themselves and suggests that we will have to depend on an outsider (Zarathustra) to show us how to "go under". Bowman's psychedelic sequence at the near-end could be seen as Kubrick's best 1960's-style attempt at depicting the mystical "going under".

I know these parallels are pretty broad, and almost certainly have been noted elsewhere despite the fact that I have not personally seen it. But I just wanted to mention them, if for no other reason than to try to dispel the myth that Nietzsche was ultimately a gloomy philosopher. Few people find the ending of 2001 to be gloomy, and it is in my opinion, explicitly and unmistakeably Nietzschean. The case could certainly be made that 2001 is above all a dramatization of "Zarathustra" updated for the modern age. Feel free to disregard the outright snobbishness of my tying everything to Nietzsche.

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



Did You Know?

Trivia

The animal used in the "Dawn of Man" sequence, the one that looks like a black pig with a trunk, is a tapir.


Quotes

HAL: Just what do you think you're doing, Dave?


Goofs

In many scenes on-board spacecraft, red lit buttons (sometimes blinking) are used for what appears to be routine status displays. Since before the 1960s, Yellow and Red have been reserved for Caution and Warning condition/ranges respectively. Status and Information lights are White and Cyan respectively.


Crazy Credits

No opening credits for actors, writers, producer, director, etc. are shown, with the story beginning right after the title. Although by the 1990s it had become quite common for major films to not have opening credits, it was still unusual in 1968.


Alternate Versions

The original theatrical release had György Ligeti's "Atmospheres" set to a black screen for roughly 8 to 10 minutes before the movie began, and Johann Strauss's "The Blue Danube" long after the end credits set to a black screen. This overture and exit music survived the premiere edits mentioned above. For a long while, revivals and all television and cable broadcasts would cut both, starting directly at the beginning of the credits and ending immediately after the end credits, but current revivals in such places as the Film Forum in New York City and cable channels such as the Sundance Channel, Bravo, the Independent Channel, and PBS have been restoring the pre- and post-movie music.


Soundtracks

Gayane Ballet Suite -- Gayane's Adagio
(1941-2)
Music by
Aram Khachaturyan
Performed by Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra (as the Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra)
Conductor Gennadi Rozhdestvensky
Courtesy Deutsche Grammophon

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Adventure | Sci-Fi

Details

Release Date:

12 May 1968

Language

English, Russian


Country of Origin

UK, USA

Filming Locations

Spitzkoppe, Erongo, Namibia

Box Office

Budget:

$12,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$202,759 20 May 2018

Gross USA:

$60,541,301

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$68,989,547

Contribute to this page

High School Icons, Then and Now

Take a trip down memory lane with photos of high school TV and movie icons then and now, from "Dawson's Creek," Clueless, and more favorites.

See the gallery

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com