Isadora (1968)

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Isadora (1968) Poster

A biography of the dancer Isadora Duncan, the 1920s dancer who forever changed people's ideas of ballet. Her nude, semi-nude, and pro-Soviet dance projects as well as her attitudes on free ... See full summary »


7/10
2,010

Photos

  • Vanessa Redgrave in Isadora (1968)
  • Vanessa Redgrave in Isadora (1968)
  • Vanessa Redgrave and Karel Reisz in Isadora (1968)
  • Vanessa Redgrave in Isadora (1968)
  • Vanessa Redgrave in Isadora (1968)
  • Vanessa Redgrave in Isadora (1968)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


6 March 2005 | ptb-8
Isadora Dancin'
ISADORA is one of those exquisitely produced big studio films of the late 60s that had a major release for 3 months and then vanished off the face of the earth forever. Some other titles this seemed to have happen to are; YOUNG WINSTON, NICHOLAS AND ALEXANDRA, MONTECARLO OR BUST (the other "Great Race" movie), STAR!, MAROONED, FINIANS RAINBOW, ON A CLEAR DAY, DARLING LILI....all presented in 70mm as souvenir ticket presentations in luxury cinemas of the time and then.....rarely revived or screened but also never forgotten, because so many people apparently saw them and remember them from this one major release. ISADORA may have been more financially successful than some mentioned above and it did have a huge impact on the beautiful Art Nouveau decor revival of the 60s (Art Deco ate the 70s..or vice versa). The look for the film was a sensation and the impact on teenage girls and their mothers was undeniable, all having a huge impact on free form ballet classes (nymphs and Grecian urns and veils) so hilariously satirized in THE BOYFRIEND in 1972. Vanessa Redgrave is synonymous with this role and one yearns for a cinema presentation of this extraordinary 20s icon now in 2005. I don't remember the film being overly criticized in 1968, it was a hit and respected for its tragic story and superb art direction. Several docos appeared on TV (one even being directed by Ken Russell) and there was quite a celebration of all things ISADORA and Vanessa in that year. But none since.

Critic Reviews


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Did You Know?

Trivia

This motion picture's opening title cards read: "Isadora Duncan 1878-1927" and "1927 - The French Riviera". As such, the film takes place during the last year of Duncan's life.


Quotes

Isadora Duncan: Tomorrow is a hypothesis.


Alternate Versions

NBC broadcast the complete roadshow version over two nights twice in the early 1970s. While that broadcast was missing (1) the Intermission music, (2) the lovemaking scene between Redgrave and James Fox, and (3) a snippet of nudity in the "Marche Slav" sequence, much new footage was added. Karel Reisz's 153-minute Director's Cut from 1987 is very close to what was seen on NBC. What is missing are some early establishing scenes of:

  • The Duncan Family taking a transatlantic cattleboat to Europe in dreadful weather.
  • The Duncan Family checking into Claridge's Hotel as "The O'Gormans" and sneaking out the next day without paying the bill
-Young Isadora and her brother Raymond improvising dances in autumn leaves in Kensington Garden -Many of the Jason Robards/Paris Singer sequences were longer and a tad more intricate. The later trimmings tightened things up a bit. -One additional dance performance sequence The Roadshow's intermission came after Isadora reveals the circumstances involving the death of her children, coming at the 2-hour mark. Russia and her death in Nice followed the Intermission and made up the film's last hour. Generally, the roadshow version differs from the Director's Cut in the overall rhythmic feel of the film. The Riviera/Nice sequences were more of the film's "spine" and the hallucinations of Isadora's children and their funerals begin as a mystery. They intersect more frequently, only very gradually revealing themselves to the viewer. By the time Isadora sits down to document her loss in the harrowing centerpiece, the audience has begun to put the puzzle pieces together.


Soundtracks

Symphonie No. 7 Beethoven 1st
Composed by
Ludwig van Beethoven
Arranged by Anthony Bowles

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Biography | Drama | Music | Romance

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