Rosemary's Baby (1968)

R   |    |  Drama, Horror


Rosemary's Baby (1968) Poster

A young couple moves in to an apartment only to be surrounded by peculiar neighbors and occurrences. When the wife becomes mysteriously pregnant, paranoia over the safety of her unborn child begins to control her life.

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8/10
166,128

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  • John Cassavetes and Mia Farrow in Rosemary's Baby (1968)
  • "Rosemary's Baby" Mia Farrow gets a haircut by Vidal Sassoon 1968 Paramount
  • Roman Polanski and Mia Farrow in Rosemary's Baby (1968)
  • Mia Farrow and Robert Evans in Rosemary's Baby (1968)
  • "Rosemary's Baby" Roman Polanski & Mia Farrow 1968 Paramount
  • Roman Polanski and Mia Farrow in Rosemary's Baby (1968)

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Cast & Crew

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Director:

Roman Polanski

Writers:

Ira Levin (novel), Roman Polanski (screenplay)

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2 May 2001 | Vince-5
One of the ultimate horror classics
Every bit of acclaim that Rosemary's Baby has earned is totally deserved. The Dakota, located at 72nd and Central Park West, is the perfect setting for the demonic events; all that rich Gothic detail in the heart of Manhattan provides the perfect atmosphere, serving as a dark fairy-tale world of its own within the modern setting. Roman Polanski knows this and utilizes it brilliantly, opening the film with stunning aerial shots of the skyline and focusing in on the ornate castle amongst the skyscrapers and tenements.

The acting is fantastic, particularly Mia Farrow, who is the only person I can envision as Rosemary. Her fine-boned fragility makes her the ideal target for terror. She goes from obliviousness to suspicion to fear to near madness without showing a seam, and we as the audience are with her all the way. And Mia is given a run for her money by the delightful Ruth Gordon, a comical yet sinister presence popping in on a deliberate schedule with pale green drinks and sandpapery advice. She's scary because we know her--a batty old broad with a seemingly sweet nature beneath her caustic surface. That such a person could possibly be a vessel of evil is a thoroughly unnerving concept.

Unnerving is the proper adjective for the entire movie. Unnerving, eerie, and penetratingly frightening in a very subtle manner. The subtlety is key, since a more explicit treatment would've spoiled everything. As the tension heightens, we feel what Rosemary feels: Curiosity, then vague suspicion, then paralyzing terror at the final revelation. At all times, the movie retains its dignity, from the opening and closing shots of the building to the flourishing title script to the beautiful music. Even on TV, this picture can chill you to the bone. The best big-budget horror movie of all time.

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