Take the Money and Run (1969)

PG   |    |  Comedy, Crime


Take the Money and Run (1969) Poster

The life and times of Virgil Starkwell, inept bank robber.


7.3/10
26,400

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  • Woody Allen in Take the Money and Run (1969)
  • Woody Allen and Janet Margolin in Take the Money and Run (1969)
  • Woody Allen in Take the Money and Run (1969)
  • Woody Allen in Take the Money and Run (1969)
  • Woody Allen in Take the Money and Run (1969)
  • Woody Allen in Take the Money and Run (1969)

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23 August 2004 | Runinrider
8
| Woody's First Good Film
Woody Allen hit gold with his second film, "Take the Money and Run", which is a basic film that works on so many levels and is memorable strictly for its charm and good wit.

The story follows Allen's Virgil Starkwell, whose life is told in documentary fashion. We learn he had a strange childhood and turned to crime to fulfill his needs. We learn of his romance and sympathize with him as we engage in prison escapes and witness him put in a chain gang. The documentary style might prove to be a "gimmick" of sorts, but it works because had the story been told any other way it simply would not have worked.

Also, "Take the Money" is an early token of what's to come and what the general audience will expect of Allen; smooth drama balanced by fast, witty monologues and lots of self-humiliation. To see this is to witness the early work of the director who ultimately brought us "Bananas", "Sleeper", "Manhattan", and the Oscar-winning "Annie Hall". And if anything, just track it for its over-the-top humor, not as in-your-face funny as "Sleeper" or as sexually hilarious as "Annie Hall", but it's warm and withdrawn, balanced all together by a very good ending (always one of the weaker parts in almost all of Allen's films).

Highly recommended! ***+ (8.5/10)

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