Kelly's Heroes (1970)

GP   |    |  Adventure, Comedy, War


Kelly's Heroes (1970) Poster

A group of U.S. soldiers sneaks across enemy lines to get their hands on a secret stash of Nazi treasure.


7.6/10
45,731


Videos


Photos

  • Clint Eastwood and Stuart Margolin in Kelly's Heroes (1970)
  • Clint Eastwood and Don Rickles in Kelly's Heroes (1970)
  • Telly Savalas and Don Rickles in Kelly's Heroes (1970)
  • Donald Sutherland and Don Rickles in Kelly's Heroes (1970)
  • Clint Eastwood and Don Rickles in Kelly's Heroes (1970)
  • Donald Sutherland in Kelly's Heroes (1970)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


5 July 2003 | SgtSlaughter
8
| Great WW2 Buddy Pic
Utterly hilarious World War II adventure picture, with some great acting by all of the leads, fine action sequences and superb scenery.

Kelly (Clint Eastwood) captures a German colonel (David Hurst), who inadvertently tells him where the Germans are hiding $16,000,000 worth of gold bars. Kelly enlists the aid of his platoon to trek behind the German lines and steal the cash.

The movie features a top-notch cast of veterans and would-be stars. Eastwood (THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY) has a quiet, serious role and floats through the entire picture. Telly Savalas (PANCHO VILLA) makes a great counterpart as the loud, short-tempered and cynical platoon sergeant. Donald Sutherland (THE EAGLE HAS LANDED) steals the show, though, in a very offbeat role as a hippie-style tank commander. He delivers some utterly 60s dialog with great style and is uproarious. Don Rickles is funny, too, in a smaller role as Crapgame - a rear-echelon supply clerk who goes along on the trek for a profit and gets more than he bargains for. Carroll O'Connor (THE DEVIL'S BRIGADE) has an un-necessary but zany role as General Colt, a blustering officer who can't understand why his red-blooded American soldiers aren't cutting through the German army. The role is obviously a knockoff of George C. Scott in PATTON, and O'Connor does an excellent job.

The supporting cast is fine, too, though not many make much of an impact. Jeff Morris is a hoot as Cowboy, a transplanted Texas hick, with Harry Dean Stanton in support as his sidekick; Stuart Margolin is a jittery radio operator; Len Lesser is a construction officer who gets conned into going along to build a bridge for the guys, and ends getting really screwed over by Kelly's boys; Hal Buckley is the platoon commander who only cares about getting his yacht to Paris; Gene Collins is the baby-faced youngster. David Hurst is lovable as the dim-witted German colonel, and it's really a shame he gets killed - especially by one of his own tanks. Karl Otto Alberty (THE GREAT ESCAPE) has a nice, small role near the end as a Tiger tank commander, and there's an anti-war spin when Kelly and crew let him escape unscathed. Watch for John G. Heller (OPERATION CROSSBOW) as the German patrol leader during the minefield scene.

The movie also features some terrific action scenes. The minefield debacle is suspenseful and nail-biting, and eventually filled with tons of gunfire and neat explosions. The final battle, in which the dozen or so heroes manage to wipe out a garrison of Germans in a small French village is expertly filmed, with some great camerawork and lots of good, convincing special effects. Some major aspects of this sequence were ripped off in SAVING PRIVATE RYAN - Tiger tanks in the street, a sniper in a bell tower, machine gunners firing from bombed-out buildings - the whole general look of the sequence was completely conned.

The Lalo Schiffrin score is light-hearted fun, and Mike Curb Congregation's "Burning Bridges" theme is a good song but doesn't at all fit the theme of the movie. The film was shot in Yugoslavia to take advantage of lower production costs. It actually looks a lot like central France, with plenty of hedgerows, bombed out buildings and such - nothing like the mountains and rivers of THE BATTLE OF NERETVA.

I saw this movie on Turner Classic Movies, appropriately letterboxed at about 2.35:1 with hardly a flaw in the print. Colors are accurate and the image is pretty sharp. TNT used to play an awful, orange-looking print of the movie (with the dialog edited to pieces, also) The audio is fine and sounds clear and loud, but the gunfire and explosions lack intensity. The film is also available on DVD.

KELLY'S HEROES is a witty, lighthearted WWII adventure which I don't think any fan can miss. If you need to sit back and watch American GIs kick German butt for 2 and a half hours for a goal as lofty as pure, all-American greed then this is your flick.

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



Did You Know?

Trivia

During filming in Yugoslavia in 1969, Donald Sutherland (Oddball) received word, via co-star Clint Eastwood (Lieutenant Kelly), that his then-wife Shirley Douglas was arrested: she had tried to buy--using a personal check--hand grenades from an undercover FBI agent for the Black Panthers. Sutherland recounts this story often, mentioning that when Eastwood got to the part about the personal check, he laughed so hard that he fell to his knees and Sutherland had to help him up. Eastwood then put his arm around Sutherland, walked him down the hill that overlooked the Yugoslavian countryside, and assured his friend of his complete support with his predicament. Sutherland and Douglas, who are the parents of Kiefer Sutherland and twin sister Rachel Sutherland, divorced in 1970.


Quotes

Oddball: Beautiful.
Moriarty: suppose the bridge ain't there?
Oddball: Don't hit me with them negative waves so early in the morning. Think the bridge will be there and it will be there. It's a mother, beautiful bridge, and it's gonna be there. Ok?
Oddball: Still up!
Oddball: ... No it ain't. See ...


Goofs

When we first see Oddball's tank, its speaker is on the right-hand side of the tank. In every other shot later on, it's on the left side. The dents come and go from the bell of the speaker horn as well.


Alternate Versions

An older video release has a very quick scene involving Germans trying to jump over a truck (after the group crosses the minefield). This scene isn't in the 1999 video; however, a scene with one of the American machine gun crews right after the deleted scene is inserted.


Soundtracks

Burning Bridges
Sung by
Mike Curb Congregation (as The Mike Curb Congregation)
Lyrics by Mike Curb
Music by Lalo Schifrin

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Adventure | Comedy | War

Details

Release Date:

23 June 1970

Language

English, French, German


Country of Origin

USA

Filming Locations

The coast South of Trieste, Yugoslavia

Box Office

Budget:

$4,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$5,200,000

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$5,200,000

Contribute to this page

Picks for "The Falcon and the Winter Soldier" Fans

Here are some titles inspired by "The Falcon and the Winter Solider" that bring back Peggy Carter, explore mysteries with a few MCU mainstays, and feature a buddy-cop duo who clash as hard as Sam and Bucky.

Watch the video

See Your Favorite '90s Stars, Then and Now

Take a look at your favorite stars from the 1990s and how they've changed in the last three decades.

See the full list

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by Taboola

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com