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All in the Family (1971–1979)

TV Series   |  TV-PG   |    |  Comedy, Drama


Episode Guide
All in the Family (1971) Poster

A working class man constantly squabbles with his family over the important issues of the day.

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8.3/10
12,463

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Photos

  • "All in the FamilyJean Stapletoncirca 1971** H.L. jean stapleton
  • jean stapleton
  • "All in the FamilyCarroll O'Connor, Jean Stapletoncirca 1971** H.L. jean stapleton
  • "All in the FamilyCarroll O'Connor, Jean Stapletoncirca 1971** H.L. jean stapleton
  • jean stapleton
  • All In The Family episode: 'Judging Books by Covers', featuring (from left) Carroll O'Connor as Archie Bunker arm wrestling Philip Carey as Steve, an ex-professional football player friend of Archie's. Image dated January 12, 1971.

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Cast & Crew

Top Series Cast



Creator:

Norman Lear

Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


5 June 2004 | tfrizzell
Arguably the Most Important Television Series of All Time.
The series was a powder keg immediately from the start as Civil Rights unrest and equal rights not only for minorities, but also women dominated headlines. And then there was Vietnam and Watergate. There was total chaos still in places in the south and in larger metropolitan areas in the north. Could television bring these public affairs to light in a comical and thought-provoking way? The answer was a resounding yes as "All in the Family" tore down perpetual American television programming walls with brash views, crazed situations, envelope-pushing elements and dominant film-making techniques (even though this was a sitcom) which all merged to paint a canvass of programming superiority that lasted for 212 mind-blowing episodes over nine years from 1971 through 1979. "The Andy Griffith Show" in the 1960s displayed how Americans wanted life to be, while "All in the Family" in the 1970s showed how American life really was. The result was a ratings monster pretty much from the word go as people watched to be entertained, to be disgusted, to praise and to criticize. The show itself was about a blue-collared New York dock worker (Carroll O'Connor) who has bigoted expressions because life continues to slap him in the face. O'Connor was definitely anti-woman, anti-minority, anti-youth and anti-liberal. He also had crazed views that would show him as being pro-Nixon and pro-Vietnam (real hot button topics back then). The show struck cords the nation over, but comedy was always mixed in and the series thrived due to both its supporters and its detractors. "All in the Family" fought problems in the U.S. by poking fun at very serious issues instead of sweeping them under the carpet like other programs of the period did. Jean Stapleton was priceless as O'Connor's kind, naive and somewhat dumb housewife. Sally Struthers was their only child, a liberal who showed the viewpoints of the Baby Boom generation. She was also married to a young man (Rob Reiner) who was O'Connor's emotional and verbal sparring partner. Reiner was of a Polish descent and that only fueled more fire between the volatile pair. O'Connor's Archie Bunker is arguably the deepest and most unique television character of all time as his crazed and sometimes silly views overshadow the fact that he is a highly sensitive middle-class man who is doing the best for himself and those around him. He is someone who does not always think before he speaks and therein lied his greatest weakness. Eventually most who saw the program embraced him as a flawed and tortured hero (not because of who he was, but because of who he really wanted to be). The lasting effect of "All in the Family" is something to think about, even today. The program continues to be vitally important to 1970s art, society and history. The success of the program even led to spin-offs galore. "Maude", "The Jeffersons", "Archie Bunker's Place" and "Gloria" were all the birth-children of this innovative, smart and completely original taste of Americana that still lives on strong today through many cable channels. 5 stars out of 5.

Critic Reviews



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Did You Know?

Trivia

At one point, during the opening credits, when "Edith" hits the (very) off notes on "And you knew where you were then", there was a laugh track that followed.


Quotes

Gloria Stivic: Daddy, what I don't understand is how can the Duke be alive if he threw himself on a grenade?
Archie Bunker: 'Cause it was an Italian grenade. It was a dud like everything else them Pasta-Fazoos made.


Goofs

Throughout the first five seasons,it appears that Mike and Gloria's bedroom is on the opposite side of the wall from Archie and Edith's bedroom. But in later episodes both bedrooms appear to be directly across the hall from eachother.


Alternate Versions

Some of the episodes shown on Nick at Nite were edited some, but the full versions were released on video. For example:

  • In the episode "Archie Gives Blood", after Archie inquires as to whether or not the nurse was "one of them senoritas", the part of him describing why he thought this was cut.
  • In the episode "Mike's Hippy Friends Come to Visit", extra dialogue was cut for no appearent reason, and the part at the end when Archie is asleep and Edith, Mike and Gloria sing offkey to wake him up was cut.
  • In the episode "Meet the Bunkers", at the end of the episode when Mike claims he's the one who bought the card that Archie supposidly got Edith was cut when aired on Nick at Nite.
  • In the episode where Archie orders Edith to quit her job but she rebels, when aired on TV Land it shows the opening where Archie comes home to find no Edith, on Nick at Nite, the episode just opens with Edith rushing in the house and getting dinner started.
  • In the episode "The Baby, Part II", Nick at Nite edits the scene where Archie enters the room occupied by Mrs. Stipic. After he asks for some cold cream to remove his dark makeup he was wearing at the minstrel show, originally Mrs. Stipic called for help, saying a "fat black man" wanted to rape her. The Nick at Nite version omits this, cutting directly to Archie asking a nurse where the restroom is located.


Soundtracks

Those Were the Days
(Opening Theme)
Written by
Lee Adams and Charles Strouse
Performed by Carroll O'Connor and Jean Stapleton

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Comedy | Drama

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