A Clockwork Orange (1971)

R   |    |  Crime, Drama, Sci-Fi


A Clockwork Orange (1971) Poster

In the future, a sadistic gang leader is imprisoned and volunteers for a conduct-aversion experiment, but it doesn't go as planned.

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  • Malcolm McDowell at an event for A Clockwork Orange (1971)
  • Stanley Kubrick in A Clockwork Orange (1971)
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971)
  • Stanley Kubrick in A Clockwork Orange (1971)
  • Malcolm McDowell in A Clockwork Orange (1971)
  • Stanley Kubrick in A Clockwork Orange (1971)

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Reviews & Commentary

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3 January 2005 | sol-
My brief review of the film
A disturbing but yet very beautiful piece of film-making, Kubrick has created the ultimate study of mind manipulation in this film. It is a protest against reform programs that take away freedom of a choice, and the message of the film in terms of paying for one's sins in all eternity is inescapable, evident to a large extent in the sardonic nature of the tale. Although set in the future, it hardly feels like it is, this being because the message of the film is overwhelmingly powerful and capable of applying to any age. The film has a number of possible hidden meanings to it – a feat equaled on scale only by Kubrick's former film '2001: A Space Odyssey'. Besides for the meaning behind the film, there are still the marks of a masterpiece. Kubrick's direction is superb alongside the good photography, capturing shadows and angles needed to establish tone. The editing is excellent too, done in a flashy, brainwashing style at times to have relevance to the film. The choice of cast is again inspirational, however the film achieves the most in terms of music. Kubrick manages to use one of the earliest forms of art, classical music, and give it an unforgettable style and importance in the film. It is truly a difficult task to explain what is so great about a film such as 'A Clockwork Orange' – it is maybe best explained by watching the film itself.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Stanley Kubrick was a perfectionist who did meticulous research, took thousands of photographs of potential locations, and did many takes of scenes; however, per Malcolm McDowell, he usually "got it right" early on, so there were few takes. So meticulous was Kubrick that McDowell stated, "If Kubrick hadn't been a film director he'd have been a General Chief of Staff of the US Forces. No matter what it is -- even if it's a question of buying a shampoo it goes through him. He just likes total control."


Quotes

Alex: There was me, that is Alex, and my three droogs, that is Pete, Georgie, and Dim, and we sat in the Korova Milkbar trying to make up our rassoodocks what to do with the evening. The Korova milkbar sold milk-plus, milk plus vellocet or synthemesc or ...


Goofs

Alex knocks on the door of the "cat ladies" house. Later when she is phoning police she says a young man "rang the bell"


Crazy Credits

There are no opening credits after the title, which is followed by the opening shot of Alex the Droog. Although it is now commonplace for major films to not have opening credits, in 1971 it was considered rather unusual and was considered a trademark of director Stanley Kubrick.


Alternate Versions

In 1986, the full uncensored "X" rated version of the film was released on home video, and later on DVD, despite the fact that the video/DVD sleeve bears the "R" rating (which leads people to believe it's the censored version). The MPAA never re-rated the uncut version as an "R", but the uncensored version does bear the "R" certification on the DVD/video box.


Soundtracks

Singin' In the Rain
by
Arthur Freed and Nacio Herb Brown
From the MGM Picture
Performed by Gene Kelly
Also performed by Malcolm McDowell (uncredited)

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Crime | Drama | Sci-Fi

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