Hector the Mighty (1972)

Not Rated   |    |  Comedy


Hector the Mighty (1972) Poster

How Cardinal Giove must do to acquire land on which stands a prestigious brothel.


5.4/10
59

Photos


See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


9 March 2008 | Bunuel1976
6
| HECTOR THE MIGHTY (Enzo G. Castellari, 1972) **1/2
I happened to notice, by chance, that this was being shown on late-night Italian TV recently; I checked out its entry on the "Stracult" book – where I learned that it was an "extremely vulgar" modernization of the perennial Helen Of Troy story…and, hence, would make for an interesting addition to my current Epic/Historical Film challenge!

Apart from that, I was highly intrigued by the credits including cult director Castellari and co-writer Lucio Fulci, a master film-maker in his own right…as, in fact, were a couple of members from its cast – namely Vittorio De Sica and Luciano Salce. The rest of the acting ensemble (despite the title, no one character takes center-stage throughout) includes Giancarlo Giannini (as Ulysses), Philippe Leroy (Hector – the "Lo Fusto" of the original title translating not to "The Mighty" as above but rather "The Stud"), Rosanna Schiaffino (Helen – depicted as a nymphomaniac, but a curiously unglamorous one), Vittorio Caprioli (Menelaus) and Orchidea De Santis (as a slut brought in especially with her companion from Perugia and who also ends up being contended by the two gangs).

The Greek setting of the original tale has been transposed to the criminal underworld in Rome – with the warring factions involved being a big-time prostitution racket and a more modest rival establishment (the updating also sees the usually stoic warrior Achilles now as a gay "Hell's Angel" though, thankfully, not a stereotype). In this respect, too, the prose of Homer's epic poem "The Illiad" is here replaced by the slang typically found in Italian films of the 1970s – while a shiny new Rolls-Royce (with the much reduced invading army concealed with great difficulty within its boot) acting as the all-important Trojan Horse! Similarly, the famed duel of champions takes place at night with flick-knives and motorbikes as opposed to javelins and chariots respectively.

In the long run, then, the general style is all over the place and the film may seem slightly overlong for its purpose; nonetheless, it's kept going by the enthusiastic performances and a lively score by the prolific and versatile Francesco De Masi. Incidentally, I'd seen three personalities involved with the film in the flesh at the 2004 Venice Film Festival: Giannini (still a star after all these years), Castellari (invited for the Italian B-movie retrospective) and De Santis (ditto – she was present to introduce the excellent but little-known political satire COLPO DI STATO [1969], coincidentally directed by her co-star from this film Luciano Salce!).

More Like This

Cold Eyes of Fear

Cold Eyes of Fear

The Loves and Times of Scaramouche

The Loves and Times of Scaramouche

The House by the Edge of the Lake

The House by the Edge of the Lake

Cipolla Colt

Cipolla Colt

The Heroin Busters

The Heroin Busters

The Big Racket

The Big Racket

Johnny Hamlet

Johnny Hamlet

One Dollar Too Many

One Dollar Too Many

High Crime

High Crime

Eagles Over London

Eagles Over London

Kill Them All and Come Back Alone

Kill Them All and Come Back Alone

Any Gun Can Play

Any Gun Can Play

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Comedy

Details

Release Date:

6 January 1972

Language

Italian


Country of Origin

Italy, France, Spain

Filming Locations

Bracciano, Rome, Lazio, Italy

Featured on IMDb

See what IMDb editors are watching this month, and visit our guides to what's on TV and streaming, family entertainment, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com