Maude (1972–1978)

TV Series   |  TV-PG   |    |  Comedy


Episode Guide
Maude (1972) Poster

"All In The Family" spin-off centered around Edith's cousin, Maude Findlay, a liberal, independent woman living in Tuckahoe, NY.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

7.2/10
2,946

Videos


Photos

  • Adrienne Barbeau and Bea Arthur in Maude (1972)
  • Bea Arthur in Maude (1972)
  • Bea Arthur in Maude (1972)
  • Bea Arthur in Maude (1972)
  • Bill Macy in Maude (1972)
  • Bea Arthur and Bill Macy in Maude (1972)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Cast & Crew

Top Series Cast



Creator:

Norman Lear

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


1 April 2007 | Syl
10
| Then There's Maude!
Unfortunately, I never saw Maude until I got the DVD first season of her show. It appeared nowhere in syndication maybe because it was too controversial and might offend too many people. Compared to other shows today, Maude is quite mainstream and ahead of it's time. I loved Beatrice Arthur in this role of Maude, forget Dorothy Zbornak. Bea plays a terrific Maude Findlay, the cousin of dimwitted Edith Bunker, from All in the Family. Anyway, the casting of Bill Macy as Maude's fourth husband is genius. They work so well together. Adrienne Barbeau is terrific as her divorced daughter, Carol. Of course, we never see Philip, the eight year old dimwitted grandson. Then there is the supporting cast which is stellar like Conrad Bain as the conservative Republican right wing doctor neighbor and friend to Walter's character and Esther Rolle who plays the African American maid, Florida Evans who is fawned over by Maude's character in the beginning that she doesn't get much work done. Don't forget Rue McClanahan as dimwitted Vivian and friend of Maude. I can't help but like Maude. For all things that she gets wrong, she gets a lot of it right. Today's television writers and developers should learn from the sitcom master, Norman Lear, that a great show like Maude's can be both controversial and funny and genius too. Most sitcoms today lack the balance between left and right. Lear's sitcoms provided both sets of opinions without winning the battle. I'm sure if the sitcom people today would watch, they might learn something about developing quality sitcoms. Remember it's not quantity but quality and it's a shame. They think we want to see beautiful people like Friends in sitcoms with minor problems and the same point of view.

Critic Reviews



Anna Chlumsky Reveals the Best Moment From "Veep"

"Veep" star Anna Chlumsky reminisces about the show and picks the Disney movie that always makes her cry during our Take 5 challenge.

Watch now

Featured on IMDb

Check out our guide to superheroes, horror movies, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com