Butterflies Are Free (1972)

PG   |    |  Comedy, Drama, Music


Butterflies Are Free (1972) Poster

A blind man moves into his own apartment against the wishes of his overprotective mother and befriends the freethinking young woman next door.

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7.2/10
4,192

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  • Goldie Hawn in Butterflies Are Free (1972)
  • Goldie Hawn and Edward Albert in Butterflies Are Free (1972)
  • Edward Albert and Eileen Heckart in Butterflies Are Free (1972)
  • Goldie Hawn and Edward Albert in Butterflies Are Free (1972)
  • Goldie Hawn and Edward Albert in Butterflies Are Free (1972)
  • Goldie Hawn in Butterflies Are Free (1972)

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User Reviews


8 March 2000 | littlejake4
7
| I would love to see this story performed on stage
I enjoyed this film very much; it appeals to the romantic in all of us, yet it is very candid. Goldie Hawn is perfect for the role of Jill, she seems so at ease with the character. Eileen Heckart is wonderful as the overbearing yet caring mother. She loves her son and it is hard for her to let go of him & to stop taking care of her son, Don, especially since he is blind. She feels that he needs someone to care for him and she thinks his new neighbor and love interest Jill is not the girl to do that. Heckart won the best supporting oscar that year for the film and she was much deserving because she is excellent. The film has some very touching scenes between each of the actors as Don struggles for independence from his mother and as he fights to convince Jill that they could have a relationship despite his blindness and how his mother has scared her away. I also love that the film has been adapted from a play and you can really sense that with simple apartment setting. A interesting note is that the Leonard Gershe who wrote the play was inspired by a real life person: Harold Krentz. Gershe heard Krentz talking on a radio show about being drafted for the military during the vietnam war, the odd thing is Harold Krentz has been blind since childhood. Harold Krentz wrote a book called "To Race the Wind" and he writes about being the inspiration for the story of Butterflies are free.

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