Last Tango in Paris (1972)

NC-17   |    |  Drama, Romance


Last Tango in Paris (1972) Poster

A young Parisian woman meets a middle-aged American businessman who demands their clandestine relationship be based only on sex.


7/10
48,510

Videos


Photos

  • Maria Schneider in Last Tango in Paris (1972)
  • Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider in Last Tango in Paris (1972)
  • Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider in Last Tango in Paris (1972)
  • Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider in Last Tango in Paris (1972)
  • Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider in Last Tango in Paris (1972)
  • Bernardo Bertolucci and Maria Schneider at an event for Last Tango in Paris (1972)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


24 June 2003 | hadleya
There are those who see ...
Okay, so I am not supposed to say anything about other user's comments, but I should mention that reading those comments is what lead me to write this...I don't know if this is an enjoyable movie experience, but it is nonetheless a triumph of cinema.

This film has very little to do with sex. It also has very little to do with the tango, and we might want to add it has little to do with Paris. Someone once told me this movie is about an American businessman. Out of curiosity, are all American's traveling in Europe businessmen? I think not. First of all, he was a boxer, a bongo player, he married a wealthy woman, but nowhere did I see this man as working for some corporation. This man had little money, and he didn't need a 'serious' career.

This film is about abuse; a parable about the overly masculine father who sexually abuses his own son; a child abused by his alcoholic parents; a widower who is abused by his animalistic but deadly honest wife. This movie is about a religious zealot for a mother-in-law in constant denial who shows more interest in her daughter's corpse than in her life. This movie is about an idealistic no-longer teenager who perhaps finds true love the only time in her life, but pays a terrible price. It is as though she has bitten from the forbidden fruit and found that love is an illusion.

To say Brando is superb misses the point. I simply know no other actor that could have pulled this off. His facial expressions are uncanny. It is a most fitting bookend to Street Car Named Desire. One simply cannot deny the final elevator scene. But unlike Streetcar, Brando portrays a vivid understanding of the sensitivity towards women and towards human existence that few men are capable of grasping, and few women could probably appreciate. Brando is himself. But Brando is himself because he understands his character, not because he plays himself.

This movie is an existential parody of the nature of society. It is a bitter reflection of human frailty and vanity. It is a tragedy of a man who has actually found a way to transcend his own suffering, who has somehow managed to cut through the illusions that all of us carry day-to-day. But with that knowledge, he finds himself utterly alone (as so many users here seem testament.)

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



Everything That's New on Netflix in August

No need to waste time endlessly browsing—here's the entire lineup of new movies and TV shows streaming on Netflix this month.

See the full list

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com