Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1974)

PG   |    |  Drama, Romance


Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1974) Poster

A recently widowed woman is on the road with her precocious young son, determined to make a new life for herself as a singer.

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7.4/10
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  • "Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore" Kris Kristofferson, Ellen Burstyn
  • Ellen Burstyn and Kris Kristofferson in Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1974)
  • Ellen Burstyn and Kris Kristofferson in Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1974)
  • Ellen Burstyn, ALICE DOESN'T LIVE HERE ANYMORE, Warner Bros., 1938, **I.V.
  • Ellen Burstyn, ALICE DOESN'T LIVE HERE ANYMORE, Warner Bros., 1938, **I.V.
  • Martin Scorsese and Lelia Goldoni in Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1974)

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30 September 2005 | evanston_dad
8
| Burstyn Is One of the Greats
Ellen Burstyn could play a tree stump and make it interesting. She's one of the unsung heroes of post-studio cinema. At a time when meaty women's roles were becoming more and more scarce, Burstyn was fighting for and winning one great part after another. She's probably never been better than she is here, though she showed tremendous range in "Same Time, Next Year" and gave one of the most heartbreakingly harrowing performances I've ever seen as recently as 2000, in "Requiem for a Dream." Women's picture and Martin Scorsese are not two phrases that would seem to be tailor made for each other, but a terrific women's picture is exactly what Scorsese gives us with "Alice..." Though I hate using the term women's picture, as if men can't enjoy stories about women, or as if women's pictures are isolated from the rest of "real" movies. Actually and ironically, maybe it was Scorsese's penchant for the tough-guy milieu that made him so right for this film, because "Alice" doesn't suffer from the burn-your-bra self-righteousness of other women's lib movies of its era, like "Un Unmarried Woman." These other films ultimately feel phony, because they were created for the most part by men, who, however noble their intentions, simply didn't have an understanding for the material. But Scorsese gets the character of Alice, and Burstyn knows exactly what she's doing. So the conflict isn't between Alice and the male world, but between the Alice who doesn't have the confidence to be anything other than a doormat and the Alice who wants to make a life for herself on her own terms.

There are some hilarious scenes between Alice and her son in this film, most particularly the scenes of them driving to California (like when Alice calls him Hellen Keller because he keeps asking "what?" to everything she says). Also, a subplot about the evolving friendship between Alice and Flo (played by Diane Ladd) becomes one of the film's highlights, not in the least because both actresses handle it expertly.

This is a winner, and must be seen by anyone who thinks Scorses is out of his element anywhere but the mean streets of NYC.

Grade: A

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