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The Godfather: Part II (1974)

R   |    |  Crime, Drama


The Godfather: Part II (1974) Poster

The early life and career of Vito Corleone in 1920s New York City is portrayed, while his son, Michael, expands and tightens his grip on the family crime syndicate.

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9/10
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  • Al Pacino and Talia Shire in The Godfather: Part II (1974)
  • Robert De Niro in The Godfather: Part II (1974)
  • Al Pacino in The Godfather: Part II (1974)
  • Talia Shire and Morgana King in The Godfather: Part II (1974)
  • Robert Duvall in The Godfather: Part II (1974)
  • Al Pacino and Francis Ford Coppola in The Godfather: Part II (1974)

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User Reviews


30 June 2008 | alexkolokotronis
10
| An Insult To Call It A Sequel
To me and probably to many other people The Godfather Part II is more of a continuation than sequel to The Godfather. Just look at the IMDb rating and you'll see I'm not the only one who feels this way. To me it as good as the first.

The acting may have been better than the acting in the original. Robert De Niro gave a perfect subtle performance as Vito Corleone. His portrayal was powerful and breathtaking. When I think De Niro I definitely do not think subtle and smooth but that is exactly what he was in here. It is definitely one of his top three performances in his career. The depth in his portrayal was able to justify the Vito Corleone that Marlon Brando portrayed in the first. Al Pacino gave a very strong performance playing Michael Corleone. In here we get to see more of the tough decisions that have to be made and the consequences of certain actions. Al Pacino perfectly displayed the amount of thought and struggle that goes into and comes out of every action you make; the way it affects relationships, family, power and influence. Diane Keaton was not really given a lot of room to act in the first but in here she is very good. She did not play the stereotypical wife who always stands behind her husband but rather the woman with a mind of her own who is willing to go after what she feels she deserves. Robert Duvall again to me was the glue to the movie. Just having him in there kind of makes you feel safe. John Cazale also had more of an impact in here than in the first playing the half-witted brother always needing to be bailed out. A lot of these characters sound so familiar and stereotypical but in The Godfather Part II every character is played out with such extraordinary depth. Everyone from Talia Shire who gave a fine performance to Lee Strasberg all the way down to the kid who played young Vito Corleone were perfect. Part II seems to me to be more of a character study than the original.

The directing once again is perfect. Francis Ford Coppola know or at least knew how to make a movie. The first to Godfather movie are done so precisely and perfectly that nothing really sticks out because they are so perfect throughout. Coppola just lets his actors play everything out as he should with type of cast he has here. Not to many movies can maintain such a consistent flow over 3 hours let alone even an hour and 45 minutes.

The writing may not have been quite as good as the first in terms of quoting but the storyline was perfect. Seeing the decisions made by new mob boss Michael Corleone was common sense but flashing back on Vito Corleone's life was genius. The storyline to me could not have been better and Coppola and Puzo do a great job with it all the way.

Like the first the cinematography was amazing but it had a slightly different tone to it. The first had more of a majestic, mythical look to it. In Part II you feel the modern times creeping in and the Corleones having to adjust to it. Part II has more of a corrupt and evil twist to it but I guess the end signifies that. The music obviously the same as the first was perfect and just fit so greatly with the rest of the movie.

The first to movies of The Godfather series are really like the same movie. They are not the same though, they are actually very different but the greatness of them both and the continuation of the storyline from the first to the second really create a strong band between each other. To me it is only a sequel in that it was the second movie of a great series. No let downs, no disappointments just a continuation of of the greatness from the first one.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Ranked #3 on the American Film Institute's list of the 10 greatest films in the genre "Gangster" in June 2008.


Quotes

Title Card: The godfather was born Vito Andolini, in the town of Corleone in Sicily. In 1901 his father was murdered for an insult to the local Mafia chieftain. His older brother Paolo swore revenge and disappeared into the hills, leaving Vito, the only male ...


Goofs

During the end credits of The Godfather Epic one of the credits is misspelled "The Godather"


Crazy Credits

As with the first film no opening credits are shown. Although it is now commonplace for films not to have opening credits, it was considered innovative in 1974.


Alternate Versions

In 1977, a special version for television titled The Godfather Saga (1977) was prepared by director Francis Ford Coppola and editor Barry Malkin by re-editing The Godfather (1972) and The Godfather: Part II (1974) in chronological order and adding deleted scenes. Most of these deleted scenes are also included separately on the DVD release and in The Godfather Trilogy: 1901-1980 (1992). Among the deleted scenes:

  • The opening credit sequence features additional shots of the Corleone compound. These shots were later used in the beginning of The Godfather: Part III (1990).
  • The opening credit sequence also features additional shots of Michael sitting alone contemplatively, an alternate take of young Vito waving little Michael's hand on the train in Sicily, and a longer take of Michael looking at Fredo at their mother's wake.
  • Don Ciccio's henchmen look for the boy Vito at his home. Vito's mother says she will bring him to Ciccio herself.
  • Don Fanucci tells the theater impresario that he should feature Sicilian songs or opera and then comically sings examples.
  • After Fanucci leaves, the impresario smacks his daughter for walking in at the wrong time.
  • Vito sees a group of hoods jump Don Fanucci and slice his neck. This explains the scar on his neck seen later.
  • Genco tells Vito about the attack on Fanucci and Vito pretends not to know about it.
  • In the café, Clemenza tells Vito that he will never work a regular job like his father did.
  • Vito meets Tessio for the first time outside a warehouse with Clemenza. They take the bag of guns inside to a man named Augustino Coppola. He tells his young son, Carmine Coppola, to play the flute as entertainment while he works on the guns. This is a tribute to Francis Ford Coppola's grandfather and father. The men also leave the warehouse with a bunch of dresses.
  • Clemenza tries to sell a dress to a married woman and ends up having sex with her while Tessio and Vito wait outside.
  • An additional shot of Vito driving down the street before Fanucci jumps in.
  • Additional dialogue after Fanucci gets out of Vito's truck.
  • Additional dialogue when Vito, Clemenza, and Tessio discuss how to handle Fanucci.
  • An extended version of the scene where Vito first talks to Signor Roberto.
  • Signor Roberto asks Genco if he can speak with "Don Vito".
  • Clemenza brings a young Jewish boy named Hyman Suchowsky to see Vito. Clemenza wants to rename him "Johnny Lips", but Vito decides he will be called "Hyman Rothstein" after Jewish gangster Arnold Rothstein.
  • When Vito returns to Sicily, he kills the two henchmen that looked for him as a boy. One he finds passed out in a hut and stabs, the other he rows up to on a lake and kills with an oar.
  • A wide shot of the train leaving the station in Sicily.
  • A quick shot of people waltzing at Anthony's communion party.
  • A quick shot of the bandleader looking at the dancers as he is conducting.
  • A man taking home movies of Tom and his family.
  • Fredo shows up late to Anthony's communion party because his wife, Deana, is drunk. She runs up the driveway demanding to see Michael, then falls down and knocks down Fredo when he tries to pick her up. Fredo warns her not to embarrass him.
  • A thirsty Pentangeli tries to get a beer or wine at the communion party, but all the waiters have are champagne cocktails. This explains why he is seen drinking from a garden hose.
  • At the party, Sonny's widow, Sandra, brings their daughter Francesca and her fiancé, Gardner, to see Michael. Fredo barges in to tell Michael that Pentangeli is outside. Michael gives Francesca and Gardner his blessing to get married. She sees Kay and tells her the good news.
  • Al Neri tells Michael that he's tracked down Fabrizio, the man who murdered Michael's first wife, Apollonia. He now runs a pizza parlor in New York and is living under the name "Fred Vincent". He was brought to New York by Barzini.
  • A shot of four opera singers performing at the party.
  • A quick shot of Rocco berating one of his men.
  • Anthony runs towards the area where the buttonmen are sitting and Kay chases after him, warning him to stay away. She then grabs and hugs Anthony.
  • Pentangeli sits with Anthony and drinks a full glass of wine in one gulp. Then, he gives Anthony a $100 bill.
  • Al Neri goes to a casino and fires Klingman on orders of Michael. When Klingman won't leave, Neri smacks him, chases him into a rehearsal of a stage show and threatens him with a chair. Klingman agrees to leave, then Neri tells the performers to continue the rehearsal which he stays and watches.
  • Fabrizio gets into his car outside his pizza parlor. He turns the ignition, and the car explodes. He falls out of the car and crawls around a bit before he dies.
  • The final scene is Kay in a Catholic church lighting candles and praying.


Soundtracks

For He's a Jolly Good Fellow
(uncredited)
Traditional

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Crime | Drama

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