That's Entertainment! (1974)

G   |    |  Documentary, Family, Musical


That's Entertainment! (1974) Poster

Various MGM stars from yesterday present their favourite musical moments from the studio's 50 year history.


7.8/10
4,352

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Photos

  • Gene Kelly in That's Entertainment! (1974)
  • Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron in That's Entertainment! (1974)
  • Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron in That's Entertainment! (1974)
  • Gene Kelly in That's Entertainment! (1974)
  • Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron in That's Entertainment! (1974)
  • Elizabeth Taylor and Gene Kelley attend the opening of "That's Entertainment"

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Cast & Crew

Top Billed Cast



Director:

Jack Haley Jr.

Writer:

Jack Haley Jr.

Awards

2 wins.

Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


5 July 2003 | didi-5
showcasing MGM's finest
In the mid-seventies, when MGM as a producing force in studio history was pretty much dead, a couple of researchers started to put together a compilation of the greatest moments from the birth of the talkie to Gigi's glut of Academy Awards at the end of the 1950s. The idea of this first 'That's Entertainment!' was to showcase the cream of the musicals, using a number of MGM's former contact stars (Frank Sinatra, Gene Kelly, Fred Astaire, Elizabeth Taylor, Mickey Rooney et al) to link segments together.

The result was so breathtaking and brilliant that two further sequels followed; one almost immediately, and the third after a gap of twenty years, in time for MGM's seventieth birthday. This first compilation shows us sequences from 'An American In Paris', 'Singin' In The Rain', 'The Harvey Girls', 'Hollywood Revue', and on, and on. It has special segments devoted to Astaire, Kelly, Garland, Garland with Rooney, and, er, Esther Williams. It should give any viewer the appetite to seek out full movies they haven't seen, and to reflect with affection on those they have.

Critic Reviews


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Did You Know?

Trivia

Elizabeth Taylor claims to be singing for herself in the "Melody of Spring" sequence from Cynthia (1947), self-deprecatingly commenting that "I was certainly no threat to Jane Powell or Judy Garland, as you'll see." In fact, Taylor was dubbed in the film, and the ghost singer is one of very few whose name has never come to light.


Quotes

Frank Sinatra: The year is 1929; the singer, Cliff Edwards, also known as Ukelele Ike. The film: "Hollywood Revue"; it is the first all-talking, all-singing, all-dancing movie ever made. In the years that followed, "Singin' in the Rain" would become a theme song ...


Goofs

Liza Minnelli states that she regularly rushed home from school to visit whichever set that her mother Judy Garland was working on at MGM. In fact, Judy Garland's final film at MGM was Summer Stock in 1949, when Ms Minnelli was all of 3 years old and, presumably in Kindergarten, unable to rush anywhere unaccompanied.


Crazy Credits

Producer Jack Haley Jr.'s credit appears over a still image of his father, Jack Haley, as the Tin Man in the Wizard of Oz.


Alternate Versions

In the "A Pretty Girl is Like a Melody" sequence from The Great Ziegfeld (1936), some prints have a slightly different narration from Frank Sinatra ending with "and somewhere in that loveliness, you'll find Dennis Morgan singing the song." In the theatrical print, presented in 1.85 widescreen, Sinatra adds the line, "If anyone could afford to film this number today, it might look something like this," as the pillarboxed "standard flat" image is expanded to fill the frame.


Soundtracks

The Trolley Song
(1944) (uncredited)
Music by
Ralph Blane
Lyrics by Hugh Martin
Played during the opening Overture
Performed by Judy Garland and others
From Meet Me in St. Louis (1944)

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Documentary | Family | Musical

Box Office

Budget:

$3,200,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$26,890,200

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$26,890,200

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