That's Entertainment! (1974)

G   |    |  Documentary, Family, Musical


That's Entertainment! (1974) Poster

Various MGM stars from yesterday present their favourite musical moments from the studio's 50 year history.

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7.7/10
4,315

Photos

  • Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron in That's Entertainment! (1974)
  • Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron in That's Entertainment! (1974)
  • Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron in That's Entertainment! (1974)
  • Gene Kelly in That's Entertainment! (1974)
  • Elizabeth Taylor and Gene Kelley attend the opening of "That's Entertainment"
  • Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron in That's Entertainment! (1974)

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Cast & Crew

Top Billed Cast



Director:

Jack Haley Jr.

Writer:

Jack Haley Jr.

Awards

2 wins.

Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


24 February 2002 | tms1983
Great musicals from a great era
If you're a fan of musicals, the old show-stopping stars, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, or all 3, this movie is a MUST SEE. It features segments of all those grand and glorious technicolor musical wonders (and some B&W's) from the brith of the movie musical through more recent productions of the 1950s and 1960s. The movie is hosted by of old stars that will make you want to get up out of your chair and dance, as they walk through a despairing and deteriorating (in 1974) M-G-M studio lot. If you haven't seen it, what are you waiting for?

Critic Reviews


Did You Know?

Trivia

The "Good Morning" number from Singin' in the Rain (1952) was originally inserted in Debbie Reynolds's hosting segment, but was cut before release -- and later placed in That's Entertainment, Part II (1976).


Quotes

Frank Sinatra: The year is 1929; the singer, Cliff Edwards, also known as Ukelele Ike. The film: "Hollywood Revue"; it is the first all-talking, all-singing, all-dancing movie ever made. In the years that followed, "Singin' in the Rain" would become a theme song ...


Goofs

At the beginning of the film, Frank Sinatra says The Hollywood Revue of 1929 (1929) is the "first all-talking, all-singing, all-dancing movie ever made,". In fact it wasn't, the first was The Broadway Melody (1929), which was released in February, nine months before "The Hollywood Revue" was ever released. Indeed, by the time of That's Entertainment III (1994), narrator Gene Kelly was now calling The Hollywood Revue of 1929, "one of the first all-talking, all-singing, all-dancing movies."


Crazy Credits

Producer Jack Haley Jr.'s credit appears over a still image of his father, Jack Haley, as the Tin Man in the Wizard of Oz.


Alternate Versions

Some TV prints show the 1951 "Show Boat" segment in cropped widescreen, when in fact the film was made in a "regular" aspect ratio (non-widescreen). Widescreen did not really come along until 1953, although Cinerama did premiere in 1952.


Soundtracks

I Wanna Be Loved by You
(1928) (uncredited)
Music by
Harry Ruby and Herbert Stothart
Lyrics by Bert Kalmar
Sung by Debbie Reynolds (dubbed by Helen Kane) with Carleton Carpenter
From Three Little Words (1950)

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Documentary | Family | Musical

Box Office

Budget:

$3,200,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$26,890,200 (USA)

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