New York, New York (1977)

PG   |    |  Drama, Music, Musical


New York, New York (1977) Poster

An egotistical saxophonist and a young singer meet on V-J Day and embark upon a strained and rocky romance, even as their careers begin a long, up-hill climb.


6.7/10
16,837

Photos

  • Robert De Niro and Liza Minnelli in New York, New York (1977)
  • Liza Minnelli in New York, New York (1977)
  • "New York, New York" Liza Minnelli on the set. 1977/UA/Chartioff-Winkler
  • Liza Minnelli in New York, New York (1977)
  • Liza Minnelli in New York, New York (1977)
  • Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese in New York, New York (1977)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


26 February 2001 | liza11
Tinseltown
New York, New York is Scorcese's most underrated film. Ahead of its time, out of the mainstream of mundane tastes, and both a tribute and a criticism of the musicals of the 40s and 50s, New York, New York is constantly misunderstood - especially by a culture weened on Rambos and Die Hards. DeNiro is a misogynist; Minnelli, a codependent. The characters are not necessarily supposed to be likeable or easily understood. They are consciously not written to be cozy, comfey typical boy-meets-girl characters. Like any couple caught in the disease of romantic addiction and career obsession, Jimmy Doyle (DeNiro) and Francine Evans (Minnelli) depict flaws that approach hyper-visibility within the context of fake scenery, big brassy musical numbers, a slow pace, and sparse dialogue. It's not that there isn't any normative plot; there just doesn't NEED to be one. Through its minimalism, NY, NY breaks boundaries for musicals in the way that Ingmar Berman films broke ground for European movies. In the 70s, people were tired of musicals and Star Wars had been released. Out with the "old," in with the new. NY, NY only LOOKED like the old movies that modern culture was trying to get away from. Had people looked at it as parody (a trend that was to consume 80s cinema), NYNY would have been seen through a truer lens. DeNiro is tempermental, insensitive, and bombastic. Minnelli is shy and patient. DeNiro is jealous and insecure. Minnelli is focused and self-assured. Minnelli, in fact, not only evokes the period, she IS the period. Her doe-shaped eyes are not lost behind her extravagant custumes, and Minnelli's voice is the best of her career, displaying everything from subtlety (in songs like "You are my Lucky Star," and "There Goes the Ball Game") to power and emotion (in "But the World Goes 'Round," and "The Man I Love"). Minnelli's classic rendition of the title song is a show stopper, coming on the heals of a 15-minute production number entitled "Happy Endings" that takes the film into a three-dimensional surreality, for within "Happy Endings" (the movie within the movie) is a ANOTHER movie called "Aces High," where a sequined Liza combines the personas of Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russel into a single glamorous diva. The film's downbeat ending is actually a sign of strength for the Minnelli character, and DeNiro's Doyle is left alone to ponder the love he left behind.

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



What to Watch: "The Expanse," '6 Underground,' & More

Here's our breakdown of the best things to stream this week including a long-awaited series return and a brand-new Michael Bay movie blowing up your small screen.

Watch our video

Featured on IMDb

Check out what IMDb editors are excited to watch this month and get gifting with IMDb's Holiday Gift Guide, curated with the entertainment lover in mind!

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com