An Unmarried Woman (1978)

R   |    |  Comedy, Drama, Romance


An Unmarried Woman (1978) Poster

A wealthy woman from Manhattan's Upper East Side struggles to deal with her new identity and her sexuality after her husband of sixteen years leaves her for a younger woman.


7.1/10
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  • Jill Clayburgh and Michael Murphy in An Unmarried Woman (1978)
  • Jill Clayburgh and Lisa Lucas in An Unmarried Woman (1978)
  • Jill Clayburgh and Michael Murphy in An Unmarried Woman (1978)
  • Alan Bates in An Unmarried Woman (1978)
  • Jill Clayburgh and Michael Murphy in An Unmarried Woman (1978)
  • Alan Bates in "Unmarried Woman" 1978 ABC

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11 June 2004 | middleburg
10
| A great, entertaining and endearing film
An Unmarried Woman was one of the best films from the late 70s/early 80s. It so completely captures a time and a place. It is a personal, perceptive story of a woman's marriage which crumbles to her total surprise. It ends up being a sort of comic--Americanized version (or more specifically New York version) of

"Scenes from a Marriage". Throughout the film we are introduced to one terrific personality after another--each distinctively drawn. From her affluent circle of friends, to the quirky, genuinely intriguing artistic types of the downtown art scene (Soho before it became SO commercial), to the assorted people she

meets on her journey of coping and understanding such as her therapist

(portrayed by the great psychologist and author, Penelope Russianoff, who was a fixture on New York's Upper Westside for years), we are treated to a wealth of fascinating characters. The movie resonates with warmth and understanding.

Jill Clayburgh's Erika is a contemporary tragic/comic heroine. She's beautiful and classy and funny and her emotions--for anyone who has gone through

divorce or separation or simply difficult marital situations--are absolutely dead- on accurate. What is very interesting some 25 years after the movie debuted is that it has not aged one single bit--the characters remain delightful, the

emotions as real as ever, and the New York milieu as varied and fascinating as it still is today (and probably always has been.) A great, entertaining, and endearing film!

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