Supertrain (1979– )

TV Series   |    |  Comedy, Drama


Episode Guide
Supertrain (1979) Poster

The adventures of a nation-spanning train and its passengers.


4.7/10
147

Photos

  • Patrick Collins in Supertrain (1979)
  • Supertrain (1979)
  • Barry Gordon in Supertrain (1979)
  • Supertrain (1979)
  • Abe Vigoda and Ilene Graff in Supertrain (1979)
  • Michael DeLano in Supertrain (1979)

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Cast & Crew

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Creators:

Earl W. Wallace, Donald E. Westlake

Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


19 November 2018 | Java_Joe
1
| The Love Boat + The Big Bus = Supertrain!
Or that's what I'm guessing the pitch for this show was.

Back in the 70's, one of the biggest shows was in fact "The Love Boat" which was a series based on a movie by the same name. Every week a colorful cast of characters on a big cruise ship, nicknamed "The Love Boat" would have some adventures, people would fall in love, there'd be banter with the crew and everything would be wrapped up in an hour's time.

Then in 1976 there was a spoof of disaster movies called "The Big Bus". The story of a giant nuclear powered bus with amenities like a bowling alley, bar / lounge, swimming pool, captain's dining room and a way to not only wash but change the tires without stopping.

Combine the two and you have one of the biggest flops on network TV called "Supertrain". It's the Love Boat on tracks. But the makers of this show seem to have forgotten something, namely the plot. While the Love Boat was a cheese fest , there was still the semblance of a plot there. The characters had motivations and reasons to be there. Whereas on Supertrain, it was the train that was the actual star. Sure you got 70's mainstays like Lyle Waggoner and Steve Lawrence to do guest starring roles but they honestly felt tacked on more than anything else.

It was the most expensive TV show made, during that time at least, and this is what led to NBC losing a ton of cash and almost going bankrupt.

It's a bad show that really should stay dead and buried.

Critic Reviews


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Did You Know?

Trivia

The Production Designer, Ned Parsons, was working with Dan Curtis on a location cowboy film, when Dan was asked by Fred Silverman to produce "The Super Train" 2 hour pilot. Ned called an illustrator friend to quickly "paint up" a concept illustration for a futuristic train racing through the country side! Returning from location, Dan Curtis set up production offices at MGM Studios. Bob Grand, Production Manager, secured five stages for the train's interior sets. Ned Parsons hired Ed McDonald as his Art Director expecting him to organize a drafting room of quick fingers to draw as fast as possible. Twelve roster senior set designers were given rough set plan layouts, expected to develop these flimsy plans into working drawings. Ned Parsons had begun his Hollywood career as a prop-member on a set decorator's swing gang crew. He was promoted by his family connections to a set decorator position. Then he was made an art director. Having some success, Ned was working with Dan Curtis, wrapping a "Western film," when Fred Silverman placed his call for the train film pilot order. This train pilot idea replaced a Fred Silverman approved projected NBC series that was to be about an air plane's passengers experiences on cross country and trans-continental flights. Ned Parsons hired Bruce Kay for his decorator. Into construction, Parsons and McDonald clashed resulting in Ned firing his Art Director. Because Bruce had a long working relationship with Hub Braden, Ned Parsons hired Hub, replacing McDonald. Ned explained the context of the sets with a drafting room set plan review, including stage walk-through of sets under construction. What a mess! And disaster! Ned asked Braden to draw plans for the rear train car, which was to be a swimming pool and rear train observation deck. This drawing was executed in three days and shown to the construction coordinator for him to order materials. Braden had planned to have set designers redraw his plan/elevation schematics for the carpenters. Told by the Coordinator "just give me that drawing and I'll get the set into work." Ironically this was the first set finished prior to filming.


Goofs

When Supertrain emerges from its terminal, there is a steam locomotive on an adjacent track, roughly 25 years after most would have been retired. I believe this shot appeared at the beginning of each episode.

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Comedy | Drama

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