Apocalypse Now (1979)

R   |    |  Drama, War


Apocalypse Now (1979) Poster

During the Vietnam War, Captain Willard is sent on a dangerous mission into Cambodia to assassinate a renegade Colonel who has set himself up as a god among a local tribe.

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8.5/10
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  • Martin Sheen in Apocalypse Now (1979)
  • Martin Sheen and Aurore Clément in Apocalypse Now (1979)
  • Marlon Brando in Apocalypse Now (1979)
  • Robert Duvall in Apocalypse Now (1979)
  • Francis Ford Coppola in Apocalypse Now (1979)
  • Martin Sheen in Apocalypse Now (1979)

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Cast & Crew

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Director:

Francis Ford Coppola

Writers:

John Milius, Francis Ford Coppola, Michael Herr (narration)

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User Reviews


25 June 2001 | Cinema_Hound
10
| You love it, or you hate it....
As I peruse through the hundreds of comments that loyal readers of the IMDB have posted on this film, I find it very interesting how few ,"middle of the road" comments there are. Everyone either loves it, or they hate it. Having seen Apocalypse Now approximately 30 times, and having recently dissected it on DVD (how did we ever live without those magical digital machines?????), I can say without hesitation that I am one of those who have a very special place in my heart for this film. "Why would you like a film that's so confusing?" ask many of my associates. The answer is this: Forget the war, forget the brutality....This is a classic story of society protecting itself from those that refuse to fall in line with the status quo. Brando represents the individual that has his own way of getting the job done. They (Big Brother) sent him out to do the job, he does it too well, without adhering to the accepted "standards" of death and destruction (Am I the only one who's troubled by the fact that we have 'standards' for death and destruction????), so they send the "Conformity Police" out to eliminate the individual. Hmmmmmm....Draw any parallels between this and things you see every day? With the deepest respect to Mr. Coppola, whom I believe is one of the best directors of all time, I think he transcended his original intent of the movie, and probably didn't even realize it until after the movie was released. The subtle sub-text that permeates the entire movie has way too much to it to have been planned and portrayed; instead, it seems to have 'grown' itself, like some wild flower in the middle of a vegetable garden. Again I must reiterate: I think FF Coppola did a bang-up job on this entire production, as did the cast and crew, but the sum of the movie exceeds the individual efforts ten-fold. So if you haven't seen the movie, rent it, watch it, then watch it again, and maybe a few more times, and look for all the generic parallels to everyday life. Only then make a judgment on the quality of the film. Those of you that have seen it, watch it again with the mindset previously described. I think you may just have a whole new appreciation for the film. Or maybe not! No matter whether you love it or hate it, be sure and give credit to Coppola for his masterful story-telling style!

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Francis Ford Coppola's wife, Eleanor Coppola, filmed and recorded the making of this film, leading to Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse (1991).


Quotes

Willard (voice-over): Saigon... shit; I'm still only in Saigon... Every time I think I'm gonna wake up back in the jungle.
Willard (voice-over): When I was home after my first tour, it was worse.
Willard (voice-over): I'd wake up and there'd be nothing. I hardly said a word to my wife, until I said "yes" to a ...


Goofs

When Willard is played the tape of Kurtz's transmissions, the male voice at the beginning of each transmission references them as originating from sectors "Peter, Victor, King" and "King, Zulu, King" respectively. By 1956, updates to the NATO phonetic alphabet included replacing "Peter" with "Papa" and "King" with "Kilo". During the time frame of the events of the film (at least the late 1960's), Army lettering code would not have referenced "Peter" or "King".


Crazy Credits

There are four different treatments of the end credits, all four are available in different VHS, laserdisc, DVD and TV prints of the film...... When the film premiered in a limited 70mm format, it had no beginning or end credits, nothing but a one-line Omni Zoetrope copyright notice at the end. Programs were passed out to theater goers in lieu of any credits. When the film went into its wide release its format was 35mm. This version included end credits rolling over surrealistic explosions and burning jungle, showing the Kurtz compound being destroyed. When Coppola heard that people were assuming that the explosions during the end credits of the 35mm version meant that an air strike had been called in on the Kurtz compound (which is not what he wanted audiences to think) he quickly re-edited the 35mm version to have the end credits rolling over a simple black background and a slightly altered musical score. The "Redux" version also has the end credits over a black background but in different screen fonts and including additional "Redux" inserted cast members.


Alternate Versions

There are four different treatments of the end credits, all four are available in different VHS, laserdisc, DVD and TV prints of the film......

  • When the film premiered in a limited 70mm format, it had no beginning or end credits, nothing but a one-line Omni Zoetrope copyright notice at the end. Programs were passed out to theatre goers in lieu of any credits (this ending was used for the theatrical cut featured on the 2011 Blu-Ray release).
  • When the film went into its wide release its format was 35mm. This version included end credits rolling over surrealistic explosions and burning jungle, showing the Kurtz compound being destroyed (included as a deleted scene on the 2011 Blu-Ray release, with optional commentary from Coppola).
  • When Coppola heard that people were assuming that the explosions during the end credits of the 35mm version meant that an air strike had been called in on the Kurtz compound (which is not what he wanted audiences to think) he quickly re-edited the 35mm version to have the end credits rolling over a simple black background and a slightly altered musical score.
  • The "Redux" version also has the end credits over a black background but in different screen fonts and including additional "Redux" inserted cast members.


Soundtracks

Excerpts from 'Mnong Gar Music from Vietnam'
Courtesy of OCORA Radio France

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