Being There (1979)

PG   |    |  Comedy, Drama


Being There (1979) Poster

A simpleminded, sheltered gardener becomes an unlikely trusted advisor to a powerful businessman and an insider in Washington politics.


8/10
64,969


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  • Peter Sellers and Melvyn Douglas in Being There (1979)
  • Peter Sellers in Being There (1979)
  • Shirley MacLaine and Melvyn Douglas in Being There (1979)
  • Shirley MacLaine and Peter Sellers in Being There (1979)
  • Peter Sellers and Jack Warden in Being There (1979)
  • Peter Sellers in Being There (1979)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


2 June 2004 | caspian1978
8
| The Great Peter Sellers
Peter Sellers should have taken home the Academy Award for his role in Being There. A lifetime of comedies behind him, Sellers ended his career as an actor and a comic legend with this classic. Hard to believe that this was made over 20 years ago, it is still as funny as ever. Since then, no other comedian has captured the raw talent of comedy that Sellers could create. The silent comedy and the physical comedy that Sellers made was not only timeless but funnier than most of the comedy we see in film today. Second to maybe his role in Lolita and in the Pink Panther series, Sellers is not only funny, but gives his best performance in Being There. A terrific story with interesting and real characters, Being There is a delight.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

It took Peter Sellers nearly nine years to get this movie made by a studio, mainly because by the 1970s Sellers' career had hit rock bottom and no studio in Hollywood would work with him. After the revival (and success) of the Pink Panther movies, Lorimar Pictures finally greenlit the project.


Quotes

Chance the Gardener: Good morning, Louise.
Louise: He's dead, Chance. The old man's dead.
Chance the Gardener: I see.


Goofs

While at dinner for the first evening with Ben and Eve, Chauncey's wine glass fills and empties within seconds.


Crazy Credits

Under the end titles of the theatrical release are outtakes of Peter Sellers as Chance recounting the encounter with Abbaz. Sellers breaks character and laughs during each attempt. The lines do not appear in the movie. Certain versions of the film have credits with white text on a black background without the outtakes.


Alternate Versions

There are two known versions of the closing credits. One features outtakes from the film featuring Sellers during the scene where Chance is getting his leg examined. And the second version, added in at the behest of Peter Sellers who was not happy with its inclusion, features the credits rolling over static, accompanied by the film's theme and sound clips from various television programs, and closed by a clip from a Gatorade commercial from the era. Most prints on television and home video use the first version of the credits. Version #2 was used on the general theatrical release, and in the 1980 MGM/CBS Home Video release of the film. Version #1 was reinstated when the film was reissued on video by CBS/FOX Video in 1983.


Soundtracks

Symphony No. 8
(uncredited)
Written by
Franz Schubert

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Comedy | Drama

Details

Release Date:

8 February 1980

Language

English, Russian, Italian


Country of Origin

West Germany, USA

Filming Locations

937 M Street NW, Washington, District of Columbia, USA

Box Office

Gross USA:

$30,177,511

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$30,177,511

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