Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979)

PG   |    |  Drama, Horror


Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979) Poster

Count Dracula moves from Transylvania to Wismar, spreading the Black Plague across the land. Only a woman pure of heart can bring an end to his reign of horror.


7.5/10
31,539


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  • Isabelle Adjani and Klaus Kinski in Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979)
  • Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979)
  • Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979)
  • Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979)
  • Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979)
  • Klaus Kinski in Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979)

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User Reviews


16 October 2007 | lost-in-limbo
9
| Bloodsucking of the breathtakingly grand.
What artistic brilliance upon Werner Herzog's behalf, but Klaus Kiniski and Isabelle Adjani stamp their lasting marks as well. Never have I been so caught up, amazed and blown away from such profound positioning, poetically creative imagery and mesmerizing performances. I found it incredibly hard to take my eyes off the screen, even though the story has been done to death. Each vividly lush and fairy-tale engraved set piece is set-up, and I hungrily waited to analyse and soak-up this magnificent art form of symbolic and superstitious embellishment. Atmospheric, old fashion chills of the subtle, but still blood-curdling kind fill Herzog's stunningly protracted direction. The story is there, but it's the little details that sets this canvas in motion. The gloomy tone of the film is powerfully brooding from the air of growing despair, loneliness to the smothering stench of dark, lingering death. Kiniski sensationally emit's a sullen, heart-felt turn where he's shadowy exterior creeps up upon you and causes goose bumps. His make-up and body movement is simply trance-like, and stares you down. He's a scavenger, which goes after what he wants and not under any sort seductive appeal. A soulful Adjani is awe-inspiring, and gracefully evokes a versatile performance that also demands your attention. A quite dry Bruno Gaz does well, and an unforgettable Roland Topor as Dracula's loyal servant totally cackles like an on edge hyena. Picturesque cinematography with unique camera-shots, and a forlornly dreamy orchestral music score set the tone. I pretty much agree with others when they say it's a hard one to put into clear and concise words. Just see it.

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Details

Release Date:

17 January 1979

Language

German, English, Romany


Country of Origin

West Germany, France

Filming Locations

Tatra Mountains, Slovakia

Box Office

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$2,874

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