The Ninth Configuration (1980)

R   |    |  Comedy, Drama, Horror


The Ninth Configuration (1980) Poster

A former marine arrives at a mental asylum housed in a remote castle to run it. There he attempts to rehabilitate the patients by letting them act out their craziest fantasies and desires.


7.1/10
5,633

Photos

  • Steve Sandor in The Ninth Configuration (1980)
  • Scott Wilson in The Ninth Configuration (1980)
  • Stacy Keach and Scott Wilson in The Ninth Configuration (1980)
  • The Ninth Configuration (1980)
  • Stacy Keach and Scott Wilson in The Ninth Configuration (1980)
  • Stacy Keach in The Ninth Configuration (1980)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


23 June 2004 | chris-1691
Excellent, but requires some intellect
Like many things that Blatty has done, the more you put into the film, the more you get out of it. I have watched it maybe a dozen times, and every time I get something out of it. If you think a Steven Seagal film is mentally taxing... be prepared to be bored.

This is one of those films that is hard to categorize (Comedy, drama, etc.) There are certainly comedic elements, such as the crazy inmate casting a Shakespeare play entirely with dogs, but I would call it a drama. It is about "crazy" war veterans in an insane asylum, and some of what they do is comedic, other things are tragic.

This movie is certainly on my top 20 list of all time greatest movies, and I would recommend it to those that enjoy a good mind-bender.

Critic Reviews



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Did You Know?

Trivia

Remastered prints of this film are dedicated to one of William Peter Blatty's children, Peter Vincent Galahad Blatty, who died at 19 years old, from a rare heart disorder. He was born on May 17, 1987 and died on November 7, 2006. An "In Loving Memory" dedication to him appears at the end, with the 1971 high tone Lorimar theme playing over it.


Quotes

Colonel Kane: Maybe we're just fish out of water.
Col. Richard Fell: What was that?
Colonel Kane: I just think about sickness, cancer in children, earthquakes, war, painful death. Death, just death. If these things are just part of our natural environment why do we think of them as evil? Why do ...


Crazy Credits

At the very end of the remastered print of this film, an "In Loving Memory" dedication to William Peter Blatty's son, Peter Vincent Galahad Blatty (May 17, 1987 - November 7, 2006) appears, with the 1971 high tone Lorimar theme playing over it.


Alternate Versions

First version seen in US during general release was distributed by Warner Brothers and ran 112 minutes. It contained following differences from the 118 min. director's cut seen on the 2002 DVD:

  • Soundtrack in Stereo
  • Opens with Warner Brothers logo
  • Credits sequence immediately follows logo and does not feature brief "computer print-out" sound fx
  • Ed Flanders' opening narration over master shot of castle immediately follows scene of Cutshaw awakening from nightmare and looking out at the sunrise, and then cuts to the wacky assembly of the men in the courtyard, which plays straight through.
  • Joke about Cutshaw's squeeze-bulb-horn cane being a "foghorn" is absent
  • No suspenseful music during Kane's introduction to the group and initial entry into the castle
  • Sound effect of chips crunching in Cutshaw's pocket absent from sound mix after the first indication
  • Cutshaw's "Show me a Catholic..." line is delivered in alternate, medium angle take
  • Fell's dialog about the men having high IQs and Kane's dissertation on evil and suffering is absent. After Fell discusses Reno it cuts directly to his joking suggestion of shock treatment
  • Reno and Spinnell's interchange regarding types of dogs for Shakespearean roles has music playing in background, is preceded by an exterior of the castle at night, and runs longer to show Cutshaw enter and add "Reno, in need you", to which Reno replies, "You need me? Hell, I need me!"
  • Reno's line to Cutshaw in the tree, regarding "ski tracks on the table" is absent
  • Lunar crucifixion dream is shown with rain falling throughout, and runs slightly longer
  • When Kane looks over at the chair, the muted calls of "Vincent!" and "Oh God, I love..." are absent from the soundtrack
  • Groper's complaints to Kane about the men are heard off-screen as Fell is seen breaking down outside Kane's office, and the scene inside the office with Kane reading the love letter is absent
  • Fairbanks trying to get a soda from the Pepsi machine is seen without hearing Reno calling for Kane and insulting Fell, which is then seen directly afterward, on-screen, before the Hamlet dissertation
  • During Reno's Hamlet dissertation, Reno insulting Fell ("coextensive with Nero's ass") is absent
  • Fairbanks complimenting the atoms in water is absent
  • The Frankenstein-masked Cutshaw has an extra line to Groper on the soundtrack after he "claims this swamp for Poland"
  • Scene of Reno trying to teach sheep Shakespeare is absent
  • As the Chain Gang parties at the bar, there is a shot of topless biker women with painted nipples dancing, in lieu of the shot of the nameless victim (seen bound and gagged in the back of a pick-up truck at the film's beginning) nodding his head
  • The exterior shot of Kane arriving at the bar runs slightly longer
  • After the bar fight, an interior scene of Kane and Cutshaw returning to the castle precedes the shot of the police car racing up to the castle. In the scene, Cutshaw lets Kane, who is wearing Cutshaw's letterman jacket like a cape, inside the main hall and they both slowly ascend the stairs to Kane's quarters
  • When Cutshaw returns to the castle in the epilogue, the exterior scene cuts to the interior at the point where Cutshaw is just entering Kane's office. The scene with Cutshaw in the main hall is absent.


Soundtracks

I'm Confessin' (That I Love You)
Written by
Al Neiburg, Doc Daugherty (as Doc Dougherty) and Ellis Reynolds

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Comedy | Drama | Horror | Mystery | Thriller

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