Blade Runner (1982)

R   |    |  Action, Sci-Fi, Thriller


Blade Runner (1982) Poster

A blade runner must pursue and terminate four replicants who stole a ship in space, and have returned to Earth to find their creator.


8.1/10
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  • Harrison Ford in Blade Runner (1982)
  • Sean Young in Blade Runner (1982)
  • Harrison Ford in Blade Runner (1982)
  • Sean Young in Blade Runner (1982)
  • Ridley Scott in Blade Runner (1982)
  • Harrison Ford in Blade Runner (1982)

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Remembering Rutger Hauer (1944-2019)

We celebrate the life and legacy of Rutger Hauer, the award-winning actor best known for Blade Runner and The Hitcher.

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


12 December 2004 | RusselleBell
Finest hour.
This is simply Scott's finest hour. There are a sheer plethora of futuristic films with vision. Films which crudely grope into a possible time ahead,when perhaps a post apocalyptic era is scattered with cliché upon cliché and often miss the whole point. What Ridley Scott achieved with this film,is an entirely possible scenario. It really does feel like a science fiction novel brought to life,but not so much as its derivative penned by Phillip K Dick(do androids dream of electric sheep?). Its a grimy,violent world inhabited by the sick,lower class,villainous second citizens who haven't quite made the grade for the off world colonies. We have a true smelting pot of nationalities.The heavy eastern references within china town like inner cities is particularly poignant.

This film also sees Ford in perfect casting.Theirs a rye charm that Ford has that no other actor could fake or fill quite as effortlessly. Its a mixed review depending on what version you have seen. For me,the directors cut is simply too cut. I preferred the audience friendly screening which had the wonderful narration. The finest moment with this narration has to be the moments described by Batty in his dying eyes and the summing up by Ford of this man/machines passion and love for life.. No other sci-fi futuristic film has ever made the grade before or since in my humble opinion. It captured the raw smells and light of a brutal future scarily depicted in films or even so well. From the chase scene with Zora to the flybys over the city capturing a stunning skyline,chimneys and skyscrapers in one shot. This is my favourite movie of all time for all the reasons above and many more i could effortlessly type all day and night.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

(at around 4 mins) The iconic blue eye seen at the beginning of the movie, where Los Angeles is reflected, belongs Morgan Paull, who plays Holden.


Quotes

Female announcer over intercom: Next subject: Kowalski, Leon. Engineer, waste disposal. File section: New employee, six days.


Goofs

(at around 46 mins) When Deckard is talking to the Egyptian snake vendor, you can see through the glass that each characters dialogue does not match their mouth movements. This is true in all versions of the film, except the Workprint. Even in 2007 "Final Cut", the obviousness of the error has been reduced, but if you look closely, you can still see that the audio doesn't quite match the visual.


Crazy Credits

In the "happy ending" Theatrical/International cuts, the credits play over the gorgeous scenery. In later Director/Final cuts, they play over a normal black background.


Alternate Versions

In 2007, Ridley Scott released "Blade Runner: The Final Cut", digitally remastered with improved visual and sound effects, and with numerous revisions to the 1992 Director's Cut. The more noticeable differences between The Director's Cut and The Final Cut include:

  • The overall film has been brightened considerably, revealing previously hidden details in many shots. Additionally, the digital enhancement reveals many heretofore obscured details, such as dirty dishes in Deckard's apartment and a freeway high above Pris as she approaches the Bradbury.
  • The opening credits have been completely redone, although in the exact same font as in the original film. The noticeable shimmer effect from the theatrical cut and the Director's Cut has been removed.
  • In the opening shot, the flames shooting up have been re-animated to look more synchronized with the associated light play on the smokestacks.
  • In the shots of the staring eye, you can briefly see the pupil react to the setting of 2019 L.A.
  • A couple of shots were trimmed (such as Deckard's intro reading the newspaper).
  • Additional smoke was added behind the cook when Gaff (Edward James Olmos) and a police officer are talking to Deckard while he is eating at the White Dragon.
  • All spinner wires have been removed and matte lines erased.
  • Bryant's (M. Emmet Walsh) line "I've got four skin jobs walking the streets" has been improved so it's not obviously an inserted recording.
  • Bryant says that "2" replicants were fried in the electrical field (as opposed to the theatrical release and Director's Cut, where he says only 1 was killed).
  • Bryant describes Leon's job during the incept tapes scene.
  • New Cityspeak and other chatter comes over on the police scanner in Gaff's spinner rides both to the police station and the Tyrell building.
  • The original shot of Roy (Rutger Hauer) in the VidPhone booth that had been recycled from the later confrontation with Tyrell (Joe Turkel) has been digitally altered so that it truly does look like Roy was in the booth. The thumb on his shoulder has also been digitally removed from the shot.
  • The hotel manager mutters "Kowalski" as he opens the door to Leon's (Brion James) room for Deckard and Gaff.
  • The new Unicorn footage is longer and shows Deckard to be awake during the sequence. This is how Ridley Scott and editor Terry Rawlings originally conceived of the scene. Deckard is shown staring into space, and there is a cut to the unicorn. The film then cuts back to Deckard and again cuts back to the unicorn, before returning to Deckard once more. The shot of the unicorn which appeared in the Director's Cut has also been recolored, and the sound mix has been completely redone.
  • The blue grid lines on the Esper machine have been reanimated, to make them look less smooth.
  • When Deckard finds Zhora lying down in the back room on the photo, the image is now that of Joanna Cassidy; previously, it was clearly someone else.
  • New footage of the LA streets before Animoid Row and Taffy Lewis's club, including the hockey-masked geisha dancers.
  • The serial number on the snake scale now matches the Animoid Row lady's dialog.
  • There is a shot of Deckard asking for directions to Taffy Lewis' from a uniformed policeman.
  • The lip flap between Deckard and Abdul Ben Hassan has been digitally corrected (using Harrison Ford's son, Ben, as a stand-in for his mouth movements).
  • In Zhora's death scene, you can tell it is her the entire time; previously it was obvious that her stunt double, Lee Pulford, was in the shot. Joanna Cassidy's head was digitally superimposed over Pulford's.
  • Deckard's cut after retiring Zhora was digitally removed (it wasn't supposed to be there until after the fight with Leon).
  • The marquee inconsistencies on the Million Dollar Theatre have been corrected.
  • During Roy's confrontation with Tyrell, he says, "I want more life, father", as opposed to "I want more life, fucker".
  • When Roy kills Tyrell, the footage is the same as that found in the International Cut, with the additional violence. Additionally, when Roy turns to Sebastian, he says "I'm sorry, Sebastian. Come. Come", as he walks towards him.
  • When Pris (Daryl Hannah) attacks Deckard, she reaches down and grabs him by the nostrils
  • When Deckard shoots Pris, he shoots 3 times instead of 2.
  • The two shadows (of Ridley Scott and Jordan Cronenweth) seen on the wall during the chase sequence have been removed.
  • When Roy pushes the nail through his hand, there is a shot of the nail coming through the skin on the other side.
  • When Roy releases the dove, it now flies up into a background that matches 2019 L.A.
  • The music which plays over the end credits is a newly composed piece by Vangelis; a different version of the 'End Credits' theme as heard in all other cuts.
  • In the closing credits, David L. Snyder is now listed as 'David L. Snyder', instead of 'David Snyder'. Additionally, Ben Astar is now credited for playing the role of Abdul Ben Hassan.


Soundtracks

Search For Clues
(uncredited)
By
James Horner
[Workprint Cut only]

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Action | Sci-Fi | Thriller

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