The Outsiders (1983)

PG   |    |  Crime, Drama


The Outsiders (1983) Poster

The rivalry between two gangs, the poor Greasers and the rich Socs, only heats up when one gang member kills a member of the other.


7.1/10
69,804

Videos


Photos

  • Rob Lowe in The Outsiders (1983)
  • Matt Dillon and C. Thomas Howell in The Outsiders (1983)
  • Francis Ford Coppola in The Outsiders (1983)
  • Francis Ford Coppola in The Outsiders (1983)
  • Rob Lowe and C. Thomas Howell in The Outsiders (1983)
  • Ralph Macchio in The Outsiders (1983)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


30 January 2013 | clopzat1
6
| Uneven
Infamous not only for the stunning amount of future (then unknown) movie stars as for it's uneven direction, "The Outsiders", by no means a poor movie, starts fantastically and a third of the way through descends into a mire of corniness and choppy staging from which it is never really able to recover from. It leaves such a bitter taste ( especially for fans of the acclaimed YA novel) I believe because it starts so well, with Francis Ford Coppola's masterful staging of ensemble scenes and a seemingly unstoppable fast pace. It's unfortunately fitting that the film starts with bouncy rock and roll ( with the song "Gloria" used to fantastic effect) and then once the plot takes a turn for the dark it seems like Coppola has entrusted his direction with Carmine Coppola's unwieldy and manipulative music score. It's not all bad once you reach the third way point, the scenes with the boys just talking in Ponyboys house really flow, but Coppola rely's a lot on uncharacteristic framing devices like poorly placed jump cuts, shifting aspect ratios, fade ins, and a whole lot of corn. While the dialog is corny during the whole movie it sticks out like a sore thumb for most of the movie while in the opening it kind of fades away with Coppola's playful direction. As far as the acting goes curiosity value makes some of it more bearable then it must have been when the movie was originally released. I shall go one by one.

C.Thomas Howell- Ponyboy Curtis- Has a very limited range of expressions and actions, though he was hot stuff for a maybe 3 more years, suffice to say, he is no longer hot stuff. Though he never really has to carry the film except during the sequences at the church where the movie falls apart.

Matt Dillon- Dallas- While he is occasionally over the top he is an extremely commanding screen presence and the best actor in the film by far.

Ralph Macchio- Johnny- Simply annoying, he manages to make most of his dialog irritating.

Patrick Swayze- Darry- Look tough, take off shirt, Say three word line, repeat. His character is way cut down from the book and never manages to seem intimidating.

Rob Lowe- Sodapop- Look cute, take off shirt, say one word line, repeat. Unfourtunely Lowe, who tries his best, has about 30 seconds of screen time. His part is extremely cut down from the book.

Tom Cruise- Steve- Simply insane. Though Coppola's camera does it's best to ignore him. He isn't really a character as much as a unintentionally amusing ball of energy.

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



More Like This

Rumble Fish

Rumble Fish

Risky Business

Risky Business

St. Elmo's Fire

St. Elmo's Fire

Red Dawn

Red Dawn

The Cotton Club

The Cotton Club

Taps

Taps

One from the Heart

One from the Heart

All the Right Moves

All the Right Moves

The Outsiders

The Outsiders

Peggy Sue Got Married

Peggy Sue Got Married

The Breakfast Club

The Breakfast Club

Pretty in Pink

Pretty in Pink

Did You Know?

Trivia

Rob Lowe turned eighteen years old during filming. According to Lowe, the other boys mercilessly played pranks on him all day on his birthday, such as Saran Wrap on his toilet seat, and filling his hotel room with fire extinguishing foam.


Quotes

Ponyboy: When I stepped out into the bright sunlight, from the darkness of the movie house, I had only two things on my mind: Paul Newman, and a ride home.


Goofs

When Dally uses phone (at 01:24:07 in 91 m.), a tilted In-and-Out burger cup is visible. There were fewer than 20 open at the time, and only in Southern California.


Crazy Credits

Closing dedication: This film is dedicated to the people who first suggested that it be made... Librarian Jo Ellen Misakian and the students of the Lone Star School in Fresno, California.


Alternate Versions

The 2005 special edition contains a re-edited cut of the film, a new soundtrack and 22 minutes of additional footage, including:

  • an extended opening scene where Ponyboy is attacked by the Socs when walking home from a Paul Newman movie. The principle Greasers are also introduced. Later, Ponyboy and Sodapop talk to each other in their bedroom.
  • a scene where Ponyboy asks some farmers how to reach Jay Mountain. He claims that he's playing "army" and "needs to report to base."
  • an alternate scene in the church where Ponyboy imagines that both Sodapop and Darry are present.
  • a short scene where Ponyboy splashes some water on his face outside the church while Johnny is out buying supplies.
  • a scene in the church where Ponyboy and Johnny become emotional over the events of the past 24 hours.
  • extended reading of "Gone With the Wind" in the church.
  • a short scene where Ponyboy finds Tim sitting on his couch in the morning.
  • a small extension to Ponyboy and Two-Bit at the hospital where a doctor allows them access to Johnny's room after being denied entrance by a nurse.
  • a short scene where Two-Bit and Ponyboy encounter Johnny's mother at the hospital.
  • Following the death of Dally, Darry lashes out at the cops while Ponyboy faints. Later, we see Sodapop and Darry caring for him in bed while Ponyboy asks if someone is sick, not realizing that he is.
  • A courtroom scene where Cherry, Randy, and Ponyboy all make statements. In the end, Ponyboy is acquitted and left in the custody of Darry.
  • A scene where Ponyboy runs into Cherry at school, but she walks away from him. Ponyboy's teacher also informs him that he is flunking, but allows him to write a paper on a personal experience in order to raise his grade.
  • A dinner scene where Sodapop becomes angry that he's always stuck in the middle between Ponyboy and Darry's tug of war and runs away. When they eventually catch him, they agree to stop fighting all the time.


Soundtracks

Stay Gold
Sung by
Stevie Wonder
Music by Carmine Coppola
Lyrics by Stevie Wonder
Courtesy of Motown Record Corporation
Recording Engineer: Gary Olazabal
Assistant Recording Engineer: Bob Harlan

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Crime | Drama

What to Watch: "Mrs. Maisel," "Vikings," and More

Save yourself from endless browsing with our list of top TV picks for the week, including a 16-time Emmy winner, the final season of "Vikings," and Scarlett Johansson's latest film.

Watch our video

IMDb's Holiday Gift Guide

Get gifting with IMDb's Holiday Gift Guide, curated with the entertainment lover in mind!

Browse our gift guide

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com