Amadeus (1984)

R   |    |  Biography, Drama, History


Amadeus (1984) Poster

The life, success and troubles of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, as told by Antonio Salieri, the contemporary composer who was insanely jealous of Mozart's talent and claimed to have murdered him.

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  • Constanze (ELIZABETH BERRIDGE) shows Mozart's music to Salieri (F. MURRAY ABRAHAM)
  • Tom Hulce in Amadeus (1984)
  • F. Murray Abraham and Tom Hulce in Amadeus (1984)
  • Mozart (TOM HULCE) composes music over a billiard table
  • Amadeus (1984)
  • Jeffrey Jones and Tom Hulce in Amadeus (1984)

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Cast & Crew

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Director:

Milos Forman

Writers:

Peter Shaffer (original stage play), Peter Shaffer (original screenplay)

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User Reviews


15 April 2003 | AngieMargie
Amadeus
When the two worlds of Antonio Salieri and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart collide in Milos Forman's Amadeus, it is anything but a symphony. As the court composer of the Emperor of Austria, all Salieri desires are fame and recognition as a composer; it is all he had wanted his whole life. When he learns that Mozart, whose name he had known as long as he can remember, is going to come to the court to play, Salieri cannot wait to meet the outstanding and righteous man that he knows he must be. However, when Salieri learns that Mozart is a young, crude, and unrefined young man, endowed with all the talent and ability that he ever wanted and strived for, it plants a seed of jealousy that soon grows into bitter resentment and hatred, not only for Mozart, but also towards God. Salieri's desire to get rid of him is seemingly boundless as he plots and schemes for Mozart's demise. It is no wonder why Amadeus won eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, with 5-Star performances by F. Murry Abraham as Antonio Salieri and Tom Hulce as Mozart. Amadeus is an emotionally charged and tragic piece, a story of the life of one of the world's most famous composers, as seen through the eyes of his worst enemy.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Salieri says that Mozart composed his first concerto at the age of four, his first symphony at seven, and a full-scale opera at twelve. Modern scholarship believes that Mozart wrote his first symphony (Symphony No 1 in E flat, K16) at the age of eight, and his first concerto (Piano Concerto No 1 in F, K37) at eleven. As for opera, the term "Full-scale" is open to interpretation, but most would cite La Finta Simplice, K46a, written when Mozart was twelve. However, Mozart's father routinely lied about his son's age to make him seem even more of a prodigy, so Salieri's statement was quite possibly what was then believed.


Quotes

Antonio Salieri: Mozart! Mozart, forgive your assassin! I confess, I killed you...


Goofs

During the comic opera, a crew member is seen when the last of the small horses pops through the side wall. The person is wearing light colored pants and is standing behind the paper wall.


Crazy Credits

"Amadeus" was originally a National Theater Production in London, then produced in America by The Shubert Organization, Elizabeth I. McCann/Nelle Nugent and Roger Berlind.


Alternate Versions

The director's cut (2002) adds the following scenes (twenty minutes in total):

  • When Salieri talks of his initial success in Vienna, a section has been added where Salieri describes how he believed God had accepted his vow, and how he honored it, working hard and often for free, while staying chaste.
  • When Salieri describes his first impression of Mozart's music to the priest, a shot has been added, where Salieri expresses his denial, saying that the music couldn't be anything but an "accident".
  • After the performance of "Die Entführung aus dem Serail", the scene has been extended after Caterina Cavalieri storms off of the stage, with Wolfgang getting a bucket of water and throwing over Frau Weber. After that a scene has been added where Salieri and Mozart visits Cavalieri in her lodge. Caterina throws some surly remarks about Constanze before she too comes and asks that she and Mozart go home. Mozart walks out on Caterina, and the scene goes to Salieri saying that he knew Mozart "had had her".
  • When Salieri asks "What was God up to?", the monologue has been extended, with Salieri speculating that it might be a test by God.
  • After Salieri admits to have started to hate Mozart, a shot has been inserted of Salieri praying, asking that Mozart be sent to Salzburg. This is immediately followed by the shot of the archbishop telling Leopold that he won't take Mozart back.
  • After Mozart refuses to submit his work for the royal appointment, a scene has been added showing Wolfgang and Constanze arguing. This establishes that the couple is in need of money.
  • When Constanze goes to visit Salieri in secret, the scene has been extended, starting with Salieri teaching a student.
  • The biggest addition comes after Constanze asks if Salieri will help them; instead of just walking out on her, he says says that she must come to his place, alone in the evening, strongly implying they must have sex for him to recommend Mozart's on the committee.
  • The scene switches to Salieri praying at his clavichord as Constanze arrives. She begins to undress, with Salieri looking shocked. When she is half-nude, Salieri calls in his valet and tells him to escort Constanze out. Humiliated and furious she throws a candelabra after him. Wolfgang finds Constanze crying in bed at home. This explains why Constanze is so eager to throw Salieri out of her home at the end of the movie.
  • Another large section is added where Salieri implies to the emperor that Mozart has been molesting young female students. This results in someone else getting the royal appointment. Mozart comes to see Salieri, receiving the news. Mozart asks Salieri for a loan, again establishing that he needs money. Salieri recommends Mozart give lessons to a Herr Schlumberg's daughter. The lesson however turns out a major frustration for Mozart, with Herr Schlumberg's dogs howling and causing a ruckus.
  • A scene has been added where Salieri and Baron Van Swieten discuss Mozart's financial difficulties. This is followed by a shot of a drunken Mozart again visiting Herr Schlumberg, asking if he may give lessons and - when denied - asks for a loan. That request is denied as well.


Soundtracks

Die Entführung aus dem Serail (Abduction from the Seraglio), K384 Act I, Singt dem Grossen Bassa Lieder
(uncredited)
Written by
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Biography | Drama | History | Music

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