Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984)

PG   |    |  Animation, Adventure, Fantasy


Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984) Poster

Warrior and pacifist Princess Nausicaä desperately struggles to prevent two warring nations from destroying themselves and their dying planet.


8.1/10
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  • Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984)
  • Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984)
  • Alison Lohman and Sumi Shimamoto in Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984)
  • Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984)
  • Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984)
  • Sumi Shimamoto in Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984)

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User Reviews


27 February 2005 | silentcheesedude
8
| A Miyazaki masterpiece
Brilliant, captivating, and sometimes just plain awesome are some of things that come to mind while watching yet another one of Miyazaki's epic tales: Nausicaä of the Valley of the Winds. Deliberately slow-moving at points, yet undeniably exciting in and out of it's action sequences, and a fantastic introduction to anime itself.

Without revealing too much of the plot, it takes us through the life of Nausicaa, a princess of a small village, and her struggles to stop warring nations from destroying an important source that can save the planet. The planet has already gone through a major destruction that nearly wiped out humanity, and their are large insects called ohmu, that guard the source that is spreading through the world.

Miyazaki introduces an empowerment of female characters in his animes, such as Princess Mononoke, Kiki's Delivery Service, and his most recent, Howl's Moving Castle (Hauru no ugoku shiro). The characters are done with style and care, and, in Nausicaa, there is no exception.

It amazes me that this film created some controversy when released, being banned in Poland because of it's depiction of an ecological disaster. Though the movie is obviously fantasy, it turns out that some may consider it a touchy subject. I didn't find any offense whatsoever with anything the movie showed, just a futuristic disaster no doubt caused by man.

Combining fantasy and science-fiction, Nausicaa is nice to look at. It certainly shows it's age when compared to some newer animes, not having the help from high-end computers. Considering it was done in the 80's, Miyazaki's production team did a great job. Little details, backgrounds, gadgets, & animals are drawn slightly better then some Japanese animes from that time.

Keep in mind that my review is based on the Disney release (Feb 2005). It's cleaned up, unedited, with new voices from well known actors that sound great (but I still prefer subtitles). Keep far away from the old version 'Warriors of the Wind', which chops off more then half-hour from the movie.

9 out of 10

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Writer and Director Hayao Miyazaki was still so upset by the truncated "Warriors of the Wind" version of Nausicaä, that when Harvey Weinstein approached him to discuss the distribution to Princess Mononoke (1997) and insisted on a similar heavily cut version of the movie, Miyazaki angrily left the meeting. Several days later, Studio Ghibli Producer Toshio Suzuki sent a katana sword to Weinstein's office with "NO CUTS" embedded into its blade. The movie was later released in the U.S. in its uncut version. During a later interview, Miyazaki commented on the incident by smiling and stating "I defeated him."


Quotes

Kurotowa: It's rotting... it's too soon...


Goofs

During the climactic battle scene, the design of Oh-Baba's headband changes several times. It sometimes has gold beads instead of gold-circled turquoise beads on the end-pieces, and alternately terminates with a single or a double line of cord.


Crazy Credits

As the credits roll we see life returning to normal in the valley: Kushana, Kurotowa and the Tolmekian fleet leave peacefully, after Nausicaä has unheard words for Kushana. The denizens of the Valley of the Wind replant trees in the burned-down forest. Lord Yupa and Asbel ride Yupa's beasts to the Toxic Jungle and explore it. When the text "The End" appears on screen we see Nausicaa's discarded helmet in the forest, alongside a green, non-Toxic Jungle sapling.


Alternate Versions

In the original Japanese version of the film, a World Wildlife logo praising the film is displayed at the beginning. For the US release from Disney, this logo was replaced with a typical Studio Ghibli logo.


Soundtracks

Saranbande
Written by
George Frideric Handel (as G.F. Händel)

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Animation | Adventure | Fantasy | Sci-Fi

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