Brewster's Millions (1985)

PG   |    |  Comedy


Brewster's Millions (1985) Poster

A minor league baseball player has to spend thirty million dollars in thirty days, in order to inherit three hundred million dollars. However, he's not allowed to tell anyone about the deal.


6.5/10
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  • Stephen Collins and Lonette McKee in Brewster's Millions (1985)
  • Richard Pryor and Lonette McKee in Brewster's Millions (1985)
  • Jerry Orbach and Richard Pryor in Brewster's Millions (1985)
  • John Candy and Richard Pryor in Brewster's Millions (1985)
  • John Candy and Rosetta LeNoire in Brewster's Millions (1985)
  • Richard Pryor in Brewster's Millions (1985)

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13 May 2012 | lee_eisenberg
7
| Pryor and Candy go wild, while Larry Tate is a slimy executive yet again
Believe it or not, "Brewster's Millions", in which Richard Pryor plays a guy who has to spend $30 million in 30 days so that he can inherit $300 million from his late uncle (Hume Cronyn) but can't tell anyone the second part, is based on a 1902 novel. And a funny adaptation it is! Pryor plays a baseball player who prefers partying with his buddy (John Candy). Once it's time for him to start spending, he goes all out. I will say that this isn't the best work for either of them, but Walter Hill's movie definitely elicits its share of laughs. The best part is Brewster's mayoral campaign: he's the most truthful candidate of all time (or at least the most realistic).

The executives who formally give Brewster the money reminded me very much of the Dukes in "Trading Places". As it is, one of them is played by a man who seems to have spent much of his career playing bombastic executives: David White, aka Larry Tate on "Bewitched". He went from playing an executive in "The Apartment", to playing the boss of a man married to a witch, to playing an executive who gives $30 million to a rule-trashing cool dude. What a country indeed!

Anyway, the movie is at once a parable about profligacy and also just a plain old fun comedy. Brewster is a guy who, quite simply, knows how to party. Like I said, it's not the funniest movie ever, but you definitely get some laughs out of it.

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