That's Dancing! (1985)

G   |    |  Documentary, Musical


That's Dancing! (1985) Poster

The history of dance depicted on film.


7.2/10
857

Photos

  • Sammy Davis Jr. in That's Dancing! (1985)
  • That's Dancing! (1985)
  • Gene Kelly and Liza Minnelli in That's Dancing! (1985)
  • Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in That's Dancing! (1985)
  • That's Dancing! (1985)
  • That's Dancing! (1985)

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Cast & Crew

Top Billed Cast



Director:

Jack Haley Jr.

Writer:

Jack Haley Jr.

Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


2 September 2014 | TheLittleSongbird
8
| Hollywood talent in the form of dance
Those who love dance of any kind and classic film will be thrilled with That's Dancing! Some segments are too short and some of the narration I agree is obtrusive(especially for the 42nd Street number)- there could have been much less of the talking over scenes- and not always necessary(the opinion on break-dancing, went on for a little too long and it did ramble a bit). The hosting is mixed, Gene Kelly is very engaging and informative and while he's not always easy to understand Mikhail Baryshnikov also says things of good value but didn't get a huge amount out of Liza Minelli. That's Dancing! is still splendid stuff though, it's skilfully filmed and the editing of the footage is done slickly and not awkwardly. The music of course is outstanding and of good variety, good that it showed more than one style or genre rather than just one without skimming the surface, and the dancing even better, especially in the Busby Berkeley, Nicholas Brothers, Flashdance, West Side Story and Fred and Ginger numbers. The scenes featured feature some deserved classics like Pick Yourself Up, Night and Day, Forty-Second Street(pretty much anything with Busby Berkeley's involvement in fact), Broadway Rhythm and If Only I Had a Brain/We're Off to See the Wizard(in an extended scene cut from the film), as well as the ballet sequence from The Red Shoes and the scene from Yankee Doodle Dandy. And of all the stars featured the ones that stood out were Fred and Ginger(obviously, it would be a crime really to miss them out), Rudolf Nureyev and Margot Fonteyn, Shirley Temple and Bojangles Robinson, Eleanor Powell, Ann Miller and the Nicholas Brothers tap-dance(the Wizard of Oz extended cut scene was charming though if too long, you can understand why it was cut). In conclusion, a very good documentary with the best stuff splendid. 8/10 Bethany Cox

Critic Reviews


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Did You Know?

Trivia

Among the excised musical numbers were five golden era standouts slated to follow the "Backwards Dance" from Give a Girl a Break (1953) in the following running order: "Pass That Peace Pipe" from Good News (1947), performed by Joan McCracken and Ray McDonald; "It" from Deep in My Heart (1954), performed by Ann Miller; "Challenge Dance" from Give a Girl a Break (1953), performed by Marge and Gower Champion; "One Alone" from Deep in My Heart (1954), performed by Cyd Charisse and James Mitchell; and "Who Gets the Girl?" from My Sister Eileen (1955), performed by Tommy Rall and Bob Fosse. After this last number, the film was to have cut back to host Ray Bolger's introduction of the Fred Astaire-Gene Kelly sequence, where the original running order was to have been as follows: "Tiger Rag" from Let's Dance (1950), performed by Fred Astaire; "Moses Supposes" from Singin' in the Rain (1952), performed by Gene Kelly and Donald O'Connor; "Slue Foot" from Daddy Long Legs (1955), performed by Fred Astaire and Leslie Caron; "We're Civilians Now" from It's Always Fair Weather (1955), performed by Gene Kelly, Dan Dailey and Michael Kidd; "Let's Kiss and Make Up" from Funny Face (1957), performed by Fred Astaire; and "Alter Ego" from Cover Girl (1944), performed by Gene Kelly.


Quotes

Gene Kelly: In 1983, film dancing entered a new era. Music videos began to play on television and in motion picture theaters, offering audiences a stylized and exhilarating form of dancing on the screen. The most innovative and certainly the most successful ...


Soundtracks

We're Civilians Now
Music by
André Previn
Performed by Gene Kelly, Dan Dailey and Michael Kidd in It's Always Fair Weather (1955)

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Documentary | Musical

Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,506,802 20 January 1985

Gross USA:

$4,210,938

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$4,210,938

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