Twice in a Lifetime (1985)

R   |    |  Drama, Romance


Twice in a Lifetime (1985) Poster

A middle-aged steelworker is content with his job and his family, but feels that something is missing in his life. On his 50th birthday, he stops in at a local bar for a drink to celebrate.... See full summary »

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6.5/10
842

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  • Brian Dennehy in Twice in a Lifetime (1985)
  • Ann-Margret and Gene Hackman in Twice in a Lifetime (1985)
  • Ellen Burstyn in Twice in a Lifetime (1985)
  • Twice in a Lifetime (1985)
  • Darrell Larson in Twice in a Lifetime (1985)

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User Reviews


18 November 2001 | moonspinner55
8
| Powerful actors' piece
At the beginning of "Twice in a Lifetime", when the McKenzie family is sitting around the dining room table celebrating, Ellen Burstyn gives long-time husband Gene Hackman a kiss, but nobody notices how he recoils a bit from her affection or how shaky his smile appears. Here is a well-made dramatic piece for a group of terrific actors, asking us to look at all sides of a divorce, offering only a few pat answers but mostly moving sequences. Hackman quickly falls into a loving relationship--which can be seen as possibly too convenient--but the woman in question is Ann-Margret at her most vivacious, so we can forgive the formula. Burstyn's character goes through the standard changes of the jilted wife, yet the talents of this wonderful actress helps transcend the clichés of such a role (she even gives it subtext and meaning; a movie about her character alone would be worth-watching). Amy Madigan's angry daughter is an overwrought creation, a one-note role, and the way she's written and directed we don't see any nuances--just her irritation. Still, many fine ingredients are included here, and the supporting players are wonderful (particularly Brian Dennehy, always good, and Ally Sheedy). Alternately tough and tender, the emotions played out at the finale are concrete--they make sense--giving this film the edge over similar pictures such as "Smash Palace" and "Shoot The Moon". *** from ****

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