Little Shop of Horrors (1986)

PG-13   |    |  Comedy, Horror, Musical


Little Shop of Horrors (1986) Poster

A nerdy florist finds his chance for success and romance with the help of a giant man-eating plant who demands to be fed.

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7/10
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  • Frank Oz in Little Shop of Horrors (1986)
  • Ellen Greene and Levi Stubbs in Little Shop of Horrors (1986)
  • Frank Oz and Lyle Conway in Little Shop of Horrors (1986)
  • Little Shop of Horrors (1986)
  • Steve Martin and Ellen Greene in Little Shop of Horrors (1986)
  • Little Shop of Horrors (1986)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


31 January 1999 | Bill-308
An off-beat delight
No, not the black & white Roger Corman jewel featuring Jack Nicholson, though I suppose I'd watch that one again too. I'm talking about the 1986 color musical with Rick Moranis and Audrey II by way of Frank Oz. Like I tell my friends about "Babe," I love a film with a Greek chorus. In this one, the chorus consists of three Motownish women singers, Crystal, Chiffon and Ronette. I'll watch this film again, just to hear them sing one line: "TO – TAL – E – CLIPSE – OF – THE – SUN!" This is an all-singing, all-dancing science fiction black comedy that features human misery, a sadistic dentist, a masochistic patient, casual murder, girlfriend abuse, and a blood-sucking alien house plant monster. It's hilarious from beginning to end. And the music is outstanding.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film was originally intended to be a summer blockbuster, with a release date of July 2, 1986. A pair of disastrous test screenings pushed the release back until December 19, with reshoots taking place in September.


Quotes

Narrator: On the twenty-third day of the month of September, in an early year of a decade not too long before our own, the human race suddenly encountered a deadly threat to its very existence. And this terrifying enemy surfaced, as such enemies often do, in ...


Goofs

The film is set in the early-'60s however at least two cars of later production are seen: the taxi that passes Seymour as he walks to the market during "Da-Doo" is a 1974 Checker, and a 1968 Volkswagen Beetle is seen driving past Mushnik when he leaves his store.


Crazy Credits

"Special Thanks" are given to Paul Dooley, because his scenes as Patrick Martin were cut and re-cast with Jim Belushi. Dooley's scenes are restored for the Director's cut, and consequently Belushi gets the "Special Thanks" instead.


Alternate Versions

Initial screenings included many deviations from the version of the film that went into general release: -The film opens with a different narrator (the same man heard on the soundtrack album.) -After Mr. Mushnik says, "I'm beginning to think maybe he's not such a nice boy," Audrey replies, "You don't meet nice boys when you live on Skid Row, Mr. Mushnik." (This line made it into some of the original trailers.) -"Skid Row" opens with a different singer (Bertice Reading's vocals were later re-dubbed by co-star Michelle Weeks). -After Audrey's verse in the song "Skid Row," shots of the local residents are edited in a different order, including a few alternate shots. -As Seymour heads to the basement at the beginning of "Grow for Me," Crystal, Chiffon and Ronette pass by the storefront window singing, the camera follows them along the sidewalk and pans down to the basement window, where Seymour looks out. -When Weird Wink Wilkinson makes machine gun noises, it cuts to shots of people in the radio studio laughing, and Wink then declares, "What a rotten shot!" -"Some Fun Now" includes an extra verse, an alternate instrumental solo (both are heard on the soundtrack album), as well as additional shots of Seymour squeezing blood out of his finger and into Audrey II's eager jaws. -There is an extended scene of Orin laughing at the photo of the dog's mouth. -The dismemberment of Orin is substantially longer and features a completely different musical orchestration. -The camera circles over Seymour's head as he lies in bed trying to sleep. In the widely released version, Seymour sits beside the bed, unable to sleep. -"The Meek Shall Inherit" includes a lengthy, surreal dream sequence and all of Seymour's dialogue (heard on the soundtrack album) is intact. -In an alternate scene, Audrey asks Seymour when Mr. Mushnik will be back from visiting his sister in Czechoslovakia, Seymour proposes to her, says they'll move to Alaska to be away from plants, and the lovers sing a brief reprise of "Suddenly Seymour." -The reprise of "Somewhere That's Green" and Audrey's death are intact. -"Don't Feed the Plants" is severely truncated, running approximately 3 minutes in total.


Soundtracks

Don't Feed The Plants
Written by
Howard Ashman and Alan Menken
Arranged and Adapted by Bob Gaudio and Robby Merkin
Produced by Bob Gaudio
Performed by Michelle Weeks, Tichina Arnold and Tisha Campbell-Martin with Bill Mitchell

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Comedy | Horror | Musical | Romance | Sci-Fi

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