Little Shop of Horrors (1986)

PG-13   |    |  Comedy, Horror, Musical


Little Shop of Horrors (1986) Poster

A nerdy florist finds his chance for success and romance with the help of a giant man-eating plant who demands to be fed.

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7/10
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  • Ellen Greene in Little Shop of Horrors (1986)
  • Ellen Greene and Levi Stubbs in Little Shop of Horrors (1986)
  • Rick Moranis and Levi Stubbs in Little Shop of Horrors (1986)
  • Frank Oz and Rick Moranis in Little Shop of Horrors (1986)
  • Little Shop of Horrors (1986)
  • Frank Oz in Little Shop of Horrors (1986)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


11 April 2003 | george.schmidt
Madcap musical mayhem
LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS (1986) ***1/2 Rick Moranis, Ellen Greene, Vincent Gardenia, Steve Martin, Jim Belushi, John Candy, Christopher Guest. Entertaining musical comedy based on the off-Broadway smash inspired by Roger Corman's cult low-budget horror flick "The Little Shop of Horrors" never lets up on energy in this decidedly camp tale about nerd Seymour Krelborn (Moranis in geek mode) the apprentice florist at a skid row floral shop whose hybrid creation of a Venus flytrap grows in more ways than one when it develops a nasty craving for human blood. Very funny and brightly directed by Muppeteer Frank Oz with lots of eye candy and expert detail of 1960 with a creme de la creme cast of comic geniuses. Outstanding especially is Martin as the sadomasochistic dentist a la Elvis and his scene with pain on the brain patient Murray (pricelessly hysterical in the role made famous by a young Jack Nicholson). Great creature visuals of "Audrey II" with voice provided by Four Tops leadman Levi Stubbs. Greene does a memorable turn as the abused heroine Audrey whose best described as Marilyn Monroe and Carol Channing purreed into one; sad sexpot with a lot of spunk and heart. Memorable songs particularly the show stopper "Suddenly Seymour".

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Did You Know?

Trivia

After the 1998 DVD was recalled, there were plans to reissue the film with a color version of the original ending, but since it had never been finalized and was only assembled for various workprints, the footage was deemed lost. In 2011, a small restoration team tracked down referential production notes and the existing negatives (which had been scattered in Hollywood, Kansas and London vaults) and assembled "The Intended Cut" without the participation of director Frank Oz or Richard Conway, who'd directed the extravagant special FX finale. Oz was so elated that Conway's footage had been restored and completed that he approved of it being called a "Director's Cut," though this was in-name only. This edit was screened at the 50th annual New York Film Festival on September 29, 2012 and issued on DVD and Blu Ray on October 9. Fans have criticized the finale's redundant footage and excessive length, as well as the omission of Seymour's lengthy soliloquy from "The Meek Shall Inherit" and other deleted/alternate scenes that were featured in early workprints, which began surfacing online in December 2012.


Quotes

Narrator: On the twenty-third day of the month of September, in an early year of a decade not too long before our own, the human race suddenly encountered a deadly threat to its very existence. And this terrifying enemy surfaced, as such enemies often do, in ...


Goofs

When Orin dies his right eyebrow twitches twice.


Crazy Credits

"Special Thanks" are given to Paul Dooley, because his scenes as Patrick Martin were cut and re-cast with Jim Belushi. Dooley's scenes are restored for the Director's cut, and consequently Belushi gets the "Special Thanks" instead.


Alternate Versions

A 23 minute alternate ending, faithful to the original, stage ending, was originally shot. In it, Audrey and Seymour are eaten by Audrey II, and, after it becomes a worldwide sensation, the world is taken over by various Audrey IIs (à la a classic B-movie horror flick.) It featured miniature effects by Richard Conway, who worked nearly a year and spent about $5 million on the sequence of Audrey II's takeover, and two songs; a reprise of "Somewhere That's Green," in which Audrey, after being attacked by Audrey II, tells Seymour to feed her to the plant after she dies so she can always be with him, and "Don't Feed The Plants," in which an off-screen chorus warns the audience not to feed the plants, no matter what they offer you. Paul Dooley appears as Patrick Martin in this version. After two failed test screenings in San Jose and Los Angeles, in which the audiences rejected the ending, the theatrical, "happy" ending was shot, in which both Audrey and Seymour survive, and Audrey II is destroyed.


Soundtracks

Suppertime
Written by
Howard Ashman and Alan Menken
Arranged and Adapted by Bob Gaudio and Robby Merkin
Produced by Bob Gaudio
Performed by Levi Stubbs, Michelle Weeks, Tichina Arnold and Tisha Campbell-Martin

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Comedy | Horror | Musical | Romance | Sci-Fi

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