The Thin Blue Line (1988)

Not Rated   |    |  Documentary, Crime, Drama


The Thin Blue Line (1988) Poster

A film that successfully argued that a man was wrongly convicted for murder by a corrupt justice system in Dallas County, Texas.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

8/10
19,626

Videos


Photos


See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Cast & Crew

Top Billed Cast



Director:

Errol Morris

Writer:

Errol Morris

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


17 August 2001 | DeeNine-2
9
| Stunning depiction of a gross miscarriage of justice
This is an extraordinary documentary in which film maker Errol Morris shows how an innocent man was convicted of murdering a policeman while the real murderer was let off scot free by the incompetent criminal justice system of Dallas, Texas. The amazing thing is that Morris demonstrates this gross miscarriage of justice in an utterly convincing manner simply by interviewing the participants. True, he reenacts the crime scene and flashes headlines from the newspaper stories to guide us, but it is simply the spoken words of the real murderer, especially in the cold-blooded, explosive audio tape that ends the film, that demonstrate not only his guilt but his psychopathic personality. And it is the spoken words of the defense attorneys, the rather substantial Edith James and the withdrawing Dennis White, and the wrongfully convicted Randall Adams that demonstrate the corrupt and incompetent methods used by the Dallas Country justice system to bring about this false conviction. Particularly chilling were the words of Judge Don Metcalfe, waxing teary-eyed, as he recalls listening to the prosecutor's summation about how society is made safe by that "thin blue line" of cops who give their lives to protect us from criminals. The chilling part is that while he is indulging his emotions he is allowing the cop killer to go free and helping to convict an innocent man. Almost as chilling in its revelation of just how perverted and corrupt the system has become, was the report of how a paid psychologist, as a means of justifying the death penalty, "interviewed" innocent Randall Adams for fifteen minutes and found him to be a danger to society, a blood-thirsty killer who would kill again.

This film will get your dander up. How the cops were so blind as to not see that 16-year-old David Harris was a dangerous, remorseless psychopath from the very beginning is beyond belief. He even took a delight in bragging about his crime. As Morris suggests, it was their desire to revenge the cop killing with the death penalty that blinded them to the obvious. They would rather fry an innocent man than convict the real murderer, who because of his age was not subject to the death penalty under Texas law. When an innocent man is wrongly convicted of a murder three things happen that are disastrous: One, an innocent man is in jail or even executed. Two, the real guilty party is free to kill again. And, three, the justice system is perverted. This last consequence is perhaps the worst. When people see their police, their courts, their judges condemning the innocent and letting the guilty walk free, they lose faith in the system and they begin to identify with those outside the system. They no longer trust the cops or the courts. The people become estranged from the system and the system becomes estranged from the people. This is the beginning of the breakdown of society. The Dallas cops and prosecutors and the stupid judge (David Metcalfe), who should have seen through the travesty, are to be blamed for the fact that David Harris, after he testified for the prosecution and was set free, did indeed kill again, as well as commit a number of other crimes of violence.

The beautiful thing about this film is, over and above the brilliance of its artistic construction, is that its message was so clear and so powerful that it led to the freeing of the innocent Randall Adams. Although the psychopathic David Harris, to my knowledge, was never tried for the crime he committed, he is in prison for other crimes and, it is hoped, will be there for the rest of his life. Errol Morris and the other people who made this fine film can pride in these facts and in knowing that they did a job that the Dallas criminal justice system was unable to do.

(Note: Over 500 of my movie reviews are now available in my book "Cut to the Chaise Lounge or I Can't Believe I Swallowed the Remote!" Get it at Amazon!)

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



More Like This

  • Gates of Heaven

    Gates of Heaven

  • Tabloid

    Tabloid

  • The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara

    The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara

  • Mr. Death: The Rise and Fall of Fred A. Leuchter, Jr.

    Mr. Death: The Rise and Fall of Fred A. Leuchter, Jr.

  • Into the Abyss

    Into the Abyss

  • Vernon, Florida

    Vernon, Florida

  • Capturing the Friedmans

    Capturing the Friedmans

  • Hoop Dreams

    Hoop Dreams

  • Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills

    Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Documentary | Crime | Drama | Mystery

Our Must-See Streaming Picks of the Week

Find out why you can't miss the new season of "Queer Eye," the latest power-grabs on "Billions," the brilliant pond-hopping comedy "Catastrophe," and more. Presented by M&M's.

Watch our video

Featured on IMDb

Check out our guide to the SXSW 2019, what to watch on TV, and a look back at the 2018-2019 awards season.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com