This movie represents the ninth and final collaboration between J. Lee Thompson with Charles Bronson. The two previously collaborated on St. Ives (1976), The White Buffalo (1977), Cabo Blanco (1980), 10 to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), Murphy's Law (1986), Death Wish 4: The Crackdown (1987) and Messenger of Death (1988).

Charles Bronson was sixty-eight-years-old when he appeared in this movie.

Director J. Lee Thompson's final film.

The last movie Charles Bronson made for Cannon Films.

Many critics felt Charles Bronson was too old to play a serving police officer.

According to the book "Charles Bronson" by Michael R. Pitts, the meaning and relevance of this movie's title is that it "refers to subjects (such as sex, child molesting, prostitution) which are forbidden topics in Japanese culture."

Charles Bronson's final film of the 1980s.

Charles Bronson's final movie that he made with both producers Menahem Golan and Yoram Globus. Though, Bronson later made Death Wish V: The Face of Death (1994) with Menahem Golan.

This movie represents the tenth and final collaboration between Pancho Kohner and Charles Bronson. They previously had made St. Ives (1976), The White Buffalo (1977), Love and Bullets (1979), 10 to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), Murphy's Law (1986), Assassination (1987), Death Wish 4: The Crackdown (1987) and Messenger of Death (1988).

The word Kinjite comes from the Japanese language and is the "-te" conjugation form of the verb "kinjiru"; which means "to forbid" in English.

Lt. Crowe's first name is never revealed.

The original script was a police drama with minimal action.

Although credited as the sole writer, Harold Nebenzal's script was rewritten before filming by producer Pancho Kohner and director J. Lee Thompson to make the material more like a Charles Bronson movie.