Missing Persons (1993–1995)

TV Series   |    |  Drama, Crime


Episode Guide
Missing Persons (1993) Poster

Follows a special police department which deals with cases where people have disappeared.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

7.1/10
53

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Cast & Crew

Top Series Cast



Creators:

Gary Sherman, Peter Lance

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


31 August 2010 | rossprag
8
| Better than anticipated
I don't disagree with the essential premise offered by the previous reviewer -- all cop shows vary from some mix of the realistic and the fantastic. C'mon, please: Lab techs who bust down doors with the badges? Decades-old cold cases where all the key suspects are still among us, living in Philadelphia? And these examples represent two of my favorite recent procedurals.

That said, I skipped this one when it first played on ABC -- I was still riding high on Hill Street Blues, and I feared Daniel J. Travanti was slumming for a gig. Never heard of the supporting cast, and when Valeria Harper came on, I figured she'd given up the ghost, as well.

Kind of glad I waited until Cannell's new omnibus DVD set came out with all 18 eps. Have watched four, and what I'm seeing so far is a fairly solid, reasonably low-key modular procedural -- the kind Ed McBain used to write with his 87th Precinct novels. It reminds me of another underestimated ABC short-timer, The Unusuals. Travanti brings his best boss sensibilities, along with some credible gray, to Lt. Ray -- the kind of guy who might have mentored Frank Furillo. Ray's short-fused impatience with incompetence and callousness is well-rationed, and his home life reminds me nostalgically of Barney Miller's.

Jorja Fox (later CSI), Frederick Weller (later In Plain Sight), and Erik King (later Dexter) all make credibly dogged investigators, following trails far freer of melodrama and coincidence than Without a Trace. I enjoy spotting out the Chicago 'hoods and the city's various cultural enclaves as the tecs seek their prey. Unlike Trace, not every step is traced with the help of an ATM or mini-mart surveillance cam, and not every missing person is involved in some labyrinthine scheme or conspiracy.

In terms of realism, I like at least the semblance of some genuine police procedure being applied to the proceedings. Stan the office phone jockey, surrounded by reverse phone directories and city maps, is another nice contribution to the ersatz-reality of the show.

This one probably would never have caught on in the pre-Bruckheimer era. But if you like a cop show with some plausible human interaction (a la Glades, Memphis Beat), I'd recommend it as a pleasant diversion and a look at some young stars who'd someday make their way. It shows me Cannell still had some oomph between the classic Rockford Files and the latter-day punch of Wiseguy.

Critic Reviews


Did You Know?

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Drama | Crime

Jared Harris Admits He Cried During 'Legally Blonde 2'

"Chernobyl" star Jared Harris takes our "Take 5" challenge, revealing the movie he thinks is basically perfect, the '80s hit he still hasn't seen, and more.

Watch now

Featured on IMDb

See what movies and TV series IMDb editors are excited about this month and check out our guide to superheroes, horror movies, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com