Farewell My Concubine (1993)

R   |    |  Drama, Music, Romance


Farewell My Concubine (1993) Poster

The story of two men, who met as apprentices in the Peking Opera, and stayed friends for over 50 years.


8.1/10
22,684

Photos

  • Li Gong in Farewell My Concubine (1993)
  • Li Gong in Farewell My Concubine (1993)
  • Li Gong in Farewell My Concubine (1993)
  • Leslie Cheung and Fengyi Zhang in Farewell My Concubine (1993)
  • Leslie Cheung in Farewell My Concubine (1993)
  • Zhi Yin in Farewell My Concubine (1993)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Cast & Crew

Top Billed Cast



Director:

Kaige Chen

Writers:

Pik Wah Lee (novel), Pik Wah Lee (screenplay), Wei Lu

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


19 May 2002 | bluzman
10
| A Tremendous Story on Many Levels
As an WASP American married a lady from Mainland China, I have a great interest in and curiosity about China. My wife's mother and father actually saw these men perform. I have discussed this movie with many Chinese friends, most of whom saw it before coming to this country. Some of them knew the story from real life as well as the movie. They are quick to point out the accuracy of the story in its detailing of Chinese history from the end of the last dynasty until its end during the Cultural Revolution. They also claim that the major happenings in the movie are real events, not the norm for most of Hollywood's "real life" stories. One point of conjecture in the movie is the sexually of Dieyi. It is presumed he is/becomes a homosexual. However, from what I have learned about the Peking/BeiJing Opera through reading and discussions, it is more likely that Dieyi was virtually unaware of his own sexuality. As opposed to being a hetero or homosexual, he was asexual in a way like it had be surgically removed from his being. It had been taken from him through the rigors of his training and years of performance. His love for Xiaolou is powerful, maybe even surpassing ordinary man/woman love, but platonic in as much as his mind is devoid of its sexuality. He suffers the same jealous anger and sense of betrayal as might be found when a wife discovers the cheatings of her husband, and reacts, unfortunately, accordingly (Heroin). His real, enduring love is performing. It is the one constant that has seen him through. He throws himself into it, being willing to perform for anyone, even as it drives the story to the end. The end of the movie is not satisfying to everyone. It was not a Hollywood ending. However, it was reality.

Critic Reviews



More Like This

To Live

To Live

Let the Bullets Fly

Let the Bullets Fly

Devils on the Doorstep

Devils on the Doorstep

In the Heat of the Sun

In the Heat of the Sun

Raise the Red Lantern

Raise the Red Lantern

Happy Together

Happy Together

Red Sorghum

Red Sorghum

Days of Being Wild

Days of Being Wild

A Chinese Odyssey: Part Two - Cinderella

A Chinese Odyssey: Part Two - Cinderella

Dying to Survive

Dying to Survive

Crazy Stone

Crazy Stone

Ju Dou

Ju Dou

Did You Know?

Trivia

Leslie Cheung was The first Hong Kong actor who acted in a mainland China film.


Quotes

Master Yuan: A smile ushers in the spring.
Master Yuan: A tear does darken all the world.
Master Yuan: How truly does this befit you. To you... only you are possessed of such charm.


Goofs

In the streets on the eve of the Communist takeover (1948), Dieyi and Xiaolou watch the chaos unfold while seen between them in the background is Master Zhang the Eunuch. The next shot reveals Master Zhang sitting across the street from them.


Alternate Versions

The following footage was deleted from the USA version:

  • After Laizi's death, Douzi and Shitou mourn next to the coffin. We see the coffin being carted away. (1:24)
  • We see Douzi being carried atop the servant's back to Old Man Zhang's quarters (0:09)
  • During the "deflowering scene" with Old Man Zhang, after the woman leaves, until Zhang says "Come here." Douzi urinates into a vase, as the old man looks on, getting quite excited. (0:21)
  • After Cheng and Duan are accosted by rioting students, after the photo session. They are being carted through the streets on handcarts. Na Kun is following, on foot. They discuss first the student revolutionaries, and then the incident at Old Man Zhang's house, which is now a coffin shop. Dieyi mentions that he was there the day before; Na conjectures that he was probably looking for the sword. (0:51)
  • After Cheng and Duan meet Yuan Shiqing for the first time, and Cheng is presented with jewelry. Brief dialogue as Yuan and then Duan leave the room. (0:19)
  • After Cheng and Duan argue in the makeup room, right before Juxian leaves the House of Blossoms. Juxian watches a performance of "Farewell". (0:55)
  • After Cheng and Duan argue during the "engagement" scene, right before Cheng tucks the baby Xiao Si into bed. Yuan presents Cheng with an elaborate pheasant headdress in his dressing room. (0:51)
  • After Japan's march into Beijing, right before Duan gets into a fight with the Japanese. Another opera scene, dealing with drink. Also one line of dialogue as Juxian applies Duan's makeup. (1:31)
  • Scene of Cheng singing to Japanese continues, right before Duan is released. Interior shots, Cheng holding a fan. Music, and applause. (0:47)
  • More graphic detail in the bloodletting scene.
  • Brief shot of Duan caressing Juxian's cheek, right after Cheng and Yuan makeup scene.
  • After our first glance of Cheng smoking opium, right before Cheng and Duan visit their old teacher. Cheng steps out of his home, smoking and looking quite listless. He chokes as a car passes. Then we see Juxian showing a group of Duan's friends to the exit of their home, recovering money that her husband has lent them. Juxian complains that Duan doesn't have a real job; Duan responds that all he can do is sing, and Juxian has forbidden that. Juxian mentions that Duan and Cheng's old teacher wants to see them; Duan says that he is too ashamed to face him. (2:02)
  • After Juxian visits Cheng in his cell, just before trial. Beginning of the trial dialogue cut, where Peking Opera is described as "pornographic music", and the formal charges of collusion with the Japanese Officer, Aoki, are described. (0:43)
  • Later, in the same trial scene, after Na's "testimony", Yuan objects to the idea of Peking Opera as "pornographic music". (1:01)
  • After the communists march into Beijing, Cheng and Duan are performing "Farewell" to an audience of communist troops. The troops do not respond, and then break into a patriotic song afterwards. Xiao Si seems to take to their philosophy. This scene cuts into what seems to be one large crowd scene in the U.S. release -- everything depicting Xiao Si (the foundling) skipping through the streets of Beijing comes after this scene. (1:52)
  • After Juxian's suicide, and before we cut to the present day, we get a short scene where the traitorous Xiao Si seems to get his due. He is sitting alone with the case of jewelry given Cheng by Yuan, and singing from "Farewell". Behind him, communist troops begin to file in, and Xiao Si is startled to see them in the mirror. One of them approaches and hands him what seems to be some sort of summons. (1:11)


Soundtracks

Farewell My Concubine Suite (Part III)
Composed by
Jiping Zhao
© 1993 Varese Sarabande

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Drama | Music | Romance

This Week on TV: "The Flash," "Limetown," and More

Plan your week of TV watching with our list of all the new originals, adaptations, and "double" features you can't miss.

Watch our video

Featured on IMDb

Check out the action from New York Comic Con check out what IMDb editors are watching this month, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com