Schindler's List (1993)

R   |    |  Biography, Drama, History


Schindler's List (1993) Poster

In German-occupied Poland during World War II, industrialist Oskar Schindler gradually becomes concerned for his Jewish workforce after witnessing their persecution by the Nazis.

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  • Oliwia Dabrowska in Schindler's List (1993)
  • Ben Kingsley in Schindler's List (1993)
  • Steven Spielberg and Liam Neeson in Schindler's List (1993)
  • Adi Nitzan and Jonathan Sagall in Schindler's List (1993)
  • Ralph Fiennes and Liam Neeson in Schindler's List (1993)
  • Liam Neeson in Schindler's List (1993)

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Cast & Crew

Top Billed Cast



Director:

Steven Spielberg

Writers:

Thomas Keneally (book), Steven Zaillian (screenplay)

Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


31 March 1999 | Docterry
Emotional Release
I don't know why but a couple of days ago I pulled out my copy of Schindler's List. At first I thought, well, maybe I'll watch a few minutes of it- it's so depressing but I feel like watching a good movie for a change. I hadn't seen this picture in several years since it was released. The first time I saw the film, in the theater, I went with my parents and was somewhat in denial. I tried to block out the pain that was before me and retain my composure. After realizing its brilliance, I tried to forget the film. It certainly wasn't something to dwell on.

This time when I watched the film I really surprised myself. I sat and cried like I haven't in years- but that's a good thing. I've been so divorced from my feelings and so wrapped up in my own selfish hell that I forgot what life is capable of becoming.

Now, Spielberg himself has admitted that he tends to over-sentimentalize things. Take the scene when Stern has just been rescued from the train by Schindler and as the two men walk away the camera pans to a large room where the suitcases of countless other souls less fortunate are being trifled through; a pile of personal photographs of family lay strewn amidst wasted boots and eye glasses. That scene destroyed me with emotion yet it was something that actually happened.

I will admit that towards the end, when Schindler was going on about how he could have sold his car to save more lives or sold his pin- even on second inspection, that scene seems rather forced- even enough for Jerry Seinfeld to mock. I was kind of mad at Spielberg. I mean, doesn't he know when to back off. It seems with an absolute masterpiece like this film, he would have been more careful and edited out this truly "sentimental" passage with violins going haywire.

Regardless, I'm in awe of this picture and with his latest- Saving Private Ryan, I do think that Spielberg is truly one of, if not, the greatest directors of film ever.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

This is the first war film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture Oscar since Platoon (1986), the first predominantly black-and-white war film to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture Oscar since The Longest Day (1962) and the first predominantly black-and-white World War II war film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture Oscar since From Here to Eternity (1953). It is also the fifth black-and-white World War II war film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture Oscar, the first World War II film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture Oscar since Patton (1970), the first World War II film to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture Oscar since John Boorman's Hope and Glory (1987), the first predominantly black-and-white film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture Oscar since The Apartment (1960), the first war film to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture Oscar since Born on the Fourth of July (1989), the first predominantly black-and-white film to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture Oscar since both The Elephant Man (1980) and Raging Bull (1980). It is the first Steven Spielberg war film to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture since Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), the first was Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981).


Quotes

Krakow registrar: Name?


Goofs

When Schindler goes to kiss the Jewish girl, he puts his hands on her shoulders. In the next shot, he pulls his hands away from her cheeks.


Crazy Credits

There are no opening credits after the title is shown.


Alternate Versions

The film, as shown in most countries, had the song "Yerushalayim shel Zahav" - Jerusalem of Gold - at the end. When the film was shown in Israel, audiences laughed at this, as this song was written after the 1967 war as a pop song! They then re-dubbed a song "Eli Eli" which was written by Hannah Sennesh during WWII over the end which was more appropriate.


Soundtracks

Yeroushalaim Shel Zahav
(Jerusalem of Gold)
Written by
Naomi Shemer
Performed by The Ramat Gan Chamber Choir Tel-Aviv
Conducted by Hana Tzur

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Biography | Drama | History

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