Tombstone (1993)

R   |    |  Action, Biography, Drama


Tombstone (1993) Poster

A successful lawman's plans to retire anonymously in Tombstone, Arizona are disrupted by the kind of outlaws he was famous for eliminating.


7.8/10
129,899

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User Reviews


27 August 2003 | cariart
A Terrific Homage to Classic Westerns!
TOMBSTONE, one of two epic westerns about Wyatt Earp released within a few months of each other (1993-94) lacks the lyrical, 'warts-and-all' quality of Kevin Costner's WYATT EARP, but is a more successful film, with tighter pacing, more clearly drawn characters, and a reverence to the genre that has made it the most popular Western of the last twenty years.

From the opening scene, narrated by the legendary Robert Mitchum, a nod to the great Hollywood Westerns of the past is evident; a gang of outlaws calling themselves 'The Cowboys' break up a Mexican wedding in a small town, ruthlessly killing nearly all the men, including village priest Pedro Armendáriz Jr. (son of the legendary Western actor), in a scene reminiscent of ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST, and THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN. Led by two of Hollywood's flashiest character actors, swaggering Powers Boothe, and coldly psychotic Michael Biehn (playing Johnny Ringo), the presence of such pure evil sets the stage for the Earps' arrival in Tombstone.

A powerful cast is essential for a great Western, and you couldn't find a better group of actors as the Earp brothers; Kurt Russell, chiseled, squinty-eyed, and razor-thin, is an ideal Wyatt; Sam Elliott, one of Hollywood's best Western actors, plays Virgil with a growl but a twinkle in his eye; and Bill Paxton, soon to achieve stardom in APOLLO 13 and TWISTER, makes a terrific Morgan. Then there is Val Kilmer, as Doc Holliday...While Dennis Quaid, in WYATT EARP, gave the most realistic portrayal of the dying dentist-turned-gambler/gunfighter ever recorded on film (he was superb), Kilmer, relying on bloodshot eyes, an ambiguous sexuality, and a Brando-esque line delivery, literally steals TOMBSTONE, and has become the 'Doc' everyone remembers. He is so charismatic that you nearly forget that the Earps are the focus of the story! Watch for his early scene confronting a shotgun-wielding (and chubby!) Billy Bob Thornton (three years before SLING BLADE), out to kill Wyatt, and you'll see my point.

The events leading up to the famous Gunfight at the O.K. Corral are clearly and decisively presented, from Wyatt's first meeting with future wife Josie (Dana Delany), to the murder of Tombstone's Marshal (Harry Carey, Jr., son of another legendary Western star, and a staple of many John Ford films), which leads to Virgil taking the badge and making his brothers (in Wyatt's case, reluctantly) deputies, to the friction with Ike Clanton (GODS AND GENERALS' Stephen Lang) that explodes into the short but bloody shootout that became legendary.

Where TOMBSTONE and WYATT EARP both excel is in presenting the aftermath of the gunfight. Unlike MY DARLING CLEMENTINE or GUNFIGHT AT THE O.K. CORRAL, the true story doesn't tie up neatly with a happy ending at the Corral, but becomes darker and bloodier. The Earps are placed under house arrest, and after they are acquitted in court, friends of Clanton (in TOMBSTONE, Ringo and other Cowboys), cold-bloodedly murder Morgan and cripple Virgil. Wyatt explodes, and grimly sets about, with Holiday and a small band of gunmen, to execute every possible Clanton ally he can find ("You tell him I'm coming! And hell's coming with me!"). Becoming a wanted fugitive himself, he only stops his mission of vengeance long enough to take the ailing Holiday to a friend's cabin (Charlton Heston has a brief but memorable cameo as the rancher), but the gambler returns in time for the gunblazing climax of the film.

TOMBSTONE is the kind of Western that critics love to say aren't made anymore, a throwback to the golden days of Ford and Hawks, when Good and Evil were clearly defined. Director George P. Cosmatos grew up on those films, as well as those of Sergio Leone, and he said, of TOMBSTONE, that it was made to honor the Westerns he loved so much.

It is his love of the Western that makes TOMBSTONE a truly superior film!

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



Did You Know?

Trivia

Before being Sheriff of Cochise County (Tombstone), Democrat John H. Behan (1844-1912) served as Sheriff of Yavapai County (Prescott) from 1871-1873. Virgil W. Earp (1843-1905) was nominated as the Republican candidate for Sheriff of Yavapai County in 1900. He subsequently withdrew for health reasons.


Quotes

Narrator: 1879 - the Civil War is over, and the resulting economic explosion spurs the great migration west. Farmers, ranchers, prospectors, killers, and thieves seek their fortune. Cattle growers turn cow towns into armed camps, with murder rates higher than...


Goofs

Although a Democrat, John H. Behan (1844-1912) was appointed sheriff of Cochise County by a Republican territorial governor of Arizona, John C. Fremont. This was because the territorial legislature was controlled by Democrats, who had to approve the choice. Fremont (1813-1890) was himself an appointee of Republican President Rutherford B. Hayes. The famed explorer was the first presidential nominee of the Republican party in 1856.


Crazy Credits

For Birgitta C.


Alternate Versions

A "Vista Series" director's cut was released in February 2002. Just under five minutes of never-before-seen footage were restored. The most noticeable are:

  • a scene showing the depths of Mattie's addiction to laudanum and her jealousy over Josephine;
  • a somber soliloquy by Doc quoting Kublai Khan;
  • a scene explaining Kate's sudden disappearance from the film, with Doc stressing the importance of friendship;
  • a scene with McMasters and the Cowboys meeting one last time. A small scene showing the graphic result of that meeting has been re-inserted, with the line "They got McMasters!" being moved into this small insert.


Soundtracks

Le Danse Macabre
by
Camille Saint-Saëns
(Accompanying music in the theatre sequence)

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Action | Biography | Drama | History | Western

Details

Release Date:

25 December 1993

Language

Spanish, English, Latin


Country of Origin

USA

Filming Locations

Patagonia, Arizona, USA

Box Office

Budget:

$25,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$6,454,752 26 December 1993

Gross USA:

$56,505,065

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$56,505,065

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