True Romance (1993)

R   |    |  Crime, Drama, Romance


True Romance (1993) Poster

In Detroit, a lonely pop culture geek marries a call girl, steals cocaine from her pimp, and tries to sell it in Hollywood. Meanwhile, the owners of the cocaine, the Mob, track them down in an attempt to reclaim it.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

7.9/10
187,474

Videos


Photos

  • Patricia Arquette and Christian Slater in True Romance (1993)
  • Patricia Arquette and Christian Slater in True Romance (1993)
  • Patricia Arquette in True Romance (1993)
  • Brad Pitt in True Romance (1993)
  • Gary Oldman in True Romance (1993)
  • Patricia Arquette in True Romance (1993)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Christian Slater: Movie & TV Moments

From early roles in True Romance and Heathers to his most recent TV role on "Mr. Robot," Christian Slater has had quite the career. Let's take a look back at some of his famous roles ...

Watch now

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


5 March 2003 | underfire35
9
| Top Notch Pulp....
True Romance is a celebration of film. It wallows in every possible seedy contrivance of American crime/action cinema. It is absolutely shameless in its exploitation of excessive violence, over-acting, melodrama, lurid sex, and rampant drug use...I love it. Quentin Tarantino, as I'm sure everyone knows, wrote the story, but it is the in execution that this film pays off. The cast, oh the cast: The lynchpins are Christian Slater and Patricia Arquette. They both give solid performances, which prevents the film from flying off the tracks; they serve as the pilot light. The supporting roles are the gas. The Walken/Hopper show down has been oft sighted as the film's best aspect, and this is, arguably, true. Just watch this scene and then watch it again. Sparks actually shoot out of the screen and burn people about the head and shoulders. OK, you've got Val Kilmer as the ghost of Elvis, Brad Pitt as a disgruntled pot-smoking loser, Tom Sizemore & Chris Penn as cops, James Gandolfini (pre-Sopranos) as a reflective hitman, and you've even got Bronson Pinchot (from TV's PERFECT STRANGERS) for God's sake. Did I forget Gary Oldman? Do yourself a favor and rent every single Gary Oldman related project (they're not all good films, but...). Why is Gary Oldman not in every film ever made? Why? I ask you why? He has got to be the best actor working today, hands down. As Drexel Spivey, Oldman chews the scenery, digests it, and then expels it from every orifice. Keep in mind that he is an English actor with a normal speaking voice at home in the Royal Shakespeare Company. His performance here is second only to his turn in LEON in blatant over-the-top insanity. Tony Scott, who along with his brother Ridley, has been known to over-direct a film or two, here chooses wisely to basically set up the camera and run. The score by Hans Zimmer adds a bouncy xylophone driven theme to the film and finds the right balance. This a well made, balls-to-the-wall, popcorn throwing, cult classic. In a market dominated with stereotypical characters, this movie avoids that trap by letting the stereotypes flourish with all the grotesque absurdity it can muster. 9/10

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



More Like This

  • Natural Born Killers

    Natural Born Killers

  • Jackie Brown

    Jackie Brown

  • From Dusk Till Dawn

    From Dusk Till Dawn

  • Four Rooms

    Four Rooms

  • Death Proof

    Death Proof

Did You Know?

Trivia

Quentin Tarantino said that he never visited the set of the movie during filming.


Quotes

Clarence Worley: In "Jailhouse Rock" he was everything rockabilly's about. I mean, he is rockabilly. Mean, surly, nasty, rude. In that movie he couldn't give a fuck about nothing except rockin' and rollin', living fast, dying young and leaving a good-looking corpse.


Goofs

When Clarence and Alabama arrive in Los Angeles, we see them driving along the freeway with the Capitol Records building in the background and the sun low on the horizon, indicating that it is evening. However, a radio announcer is talking about it being morning.


Alternate Versions

The US theatrical version runs 118 minutes and was heavily cut for violence in order to receive an R-rating. This version was released to US theaters in 1993 and as a rental VHS in the US in 1994. It still occasionally shows up on premium cable and streaming services. The Director's Cut (also known as the 'Unrated' edition) runs 121 minutes and is the only version that has been released on DVD and Blu-Ray worldwide, initially appearing as a buy-only VHS and laserdisc in the US. The Director's Cut changes the following: -The death of Big Don and his dealer is more violent. -Drexl beating up Clarence and the subsequent shoot-out in Drexl's club are longer. -The extremely brutal fight between Virgil and Alabama is over a full minute longer and ends with Alabama beating Virgil's body over the head repeatedly with the butt of the shotgun. -The final shootout in the hotel room is longer and bloodier. -Instead of being killed by a random mafioso, Nicky is shot by Alabama in the Director's Cut.


Soundtracks

Everybody Loves Somebody
by
Ken Lane
Performed by Jerry DelMonico
Courtesy of Associated Production Music

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Crime | Drama | Romance | Thriller

Christopher Meloni Reminds Us "Happy!" Is Not for Kids

The "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit" veteran lets his comedic side loose in "Happy!" and hints at what we can expect from his new character on Season 3 of "The Handmaid's Tale."

Watch now

Featured on IMDb

Check out our guide to superheroes, horror movies, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com