Iron Will (1994)

PG   |    |  Adventure, Family


Iron Will (1994) Poster

When Will Stoneman's father dies, he is left alone to take care of his mother and their land. Needing money to maintain it, he decides to join a cross country dogsled race. This race will ... See full summary »


6.5/10
6,693

Photos

  • Mackenzie Astin in Iron Will (1994)
  • David Ogden Stiers and Brian Cox in Iron Will (1994)
  • Mackenzie Astin in Iron Will (1994)
  • Mackenzie Astin in Iron Will (1994)
  • Iron Will (1994)
  • Mackenzie Astin in Iron Will (1994)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


22 July 2013 | g-bodyl
8
| Pleasant Family Fare!
Iron Will is a good, predictable film that you can immediately tell it's a Disney-produced film because of the inner deep meanings that are essential with all Disney films. This is a movie that is good for all ages. I saw this in 5th grade, and I just saw it again many years later and still thoroughly enjoyed it. It's very predictable but if you don't think and just watch, this movie will be good.

Charles Haid's film is a coming-of-age story about a kid who recently lost his father due to a tragedy and his farm is in danger of being foreclosed. He enters a dogsled race that's eerily similar to the Iditarod and his goal is to win the top prize that will allow him to keep the farm and go to college.

The acting isn't all that bad. Mackenzie Astin does okay with what he got to work with. Kevin Spacey is magnificent as always. I always love when Brian Cox plays a slimy guy because he is so good at doing it.

Overall, this is your typical Disney film. It's family-friendly and it features many adorable dogs. Speaking of dogs, I do like that Gus(the lead dog on dog team). He's a courageous little guy. Despite the film being predictable, I still hung on to all the tense moments. It's a good, little-known film that people should see. I rate this film 8/10.

Critic Reviews



More Like This

White Fang 2: Myth of the White Wolf

White Fang 2: Myth of the White Wolf

The Air Up There

The Air Up There

Eight Below

Eight Below

A Far Off Place

A Far Off Place

Cheetah

Cheetah

The Three Musketeers

The Three Musketeers

Not Quite Human II

Not Quite Human II

The Journey of Natty Gann

The Journey of Natty Gann

Blank Check

Blank Check

The Rocketeer

The Rocketeer

Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey

Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey

Not Quite Human

Not Quite Human

Did You Know?

Trivia

The movie is a fictionalized account of the 1917 Winnipeg-to-St. Paul dog-sled race, sponsored by the Great Northern Railway. The main character in the movie, Will Stoneman, is based on two real-life participants in the 1917 race: Albert Campbell, the eventual winner, a mixed-blood Cree trapper from Manitoba who endured harassment from his racist white competitors throughout the race; and Fred Hartman, one of only two American participants, was touted as a hero during the race by American newspapers. His sled dogs fought among themselves and his lead dog was killed. The other American racer dropped out two days before the finish but Fred continued, coming in last and then collapsed. J.W. Harper, the president of the St. Paul Winter Carnival in the movie, is based on Louis W. Hill, son of railroad magnate James J. Hill, president of the Great Northern Railroad.


Quotes

Ned Dodd: Training begins now.
Will Stoneman: Ned? Ned, it's cold! Ned! Ned! Mom! Mom! Mom, please, it's cold! Mom, it's cold! Mom!


Goofs

After Will crashes after dodging the "Army" truck. It is revealed that there is a Marine recruiting poster on the side of the truck. (The US Marines would never advertise on an army truck.) There is certainly a competitiveness in today's U.S. armed services; back in 1917 President Woodrow Wilson created the Committee On Public Information. This committee tasked "The Society of Illustrators" out of New York to create artwork that illustrated the demands that the Great War was placing on America and on American servicemen and women. These pieces of public art were created by some 300 of America's top designer's and were ordered to be placed on "every" wall and publicly viewable surface. Given the great need for the American public to support the war effort during The Great War, it is not unreasonable that an Army vehicle would show it's patriotism by sporting a U.S. Marine recruitment poster.


Crazy Credits

The character played by David Ogden Stiers is misspelled in the end credits as "J. P. Harper" despite being referred to as "J. W." throughout the movie.

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Adventure | Family

This Week on TV: "The Flash," "Limetown," and More

Plan your week of TV watching with our list of all the new originals, adaptations, and "double" features you can't miss.

Watch our video

Featured on IMDb

Check out the action from New York Comic Con check out what IMDb editors are watching this month, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com