Natural Born Killers (1994)

R   |    |  Crime, Drama


Natural Born Killers (1994) Poster

Two victims of traumatized childhoods become lovers and psychopathic serial murderers irresponsibly glorified by the mass media.


7.3/10
202,565

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  • Woody Harrelson in Natural Born Killers (1994)
  • Woody Harrelson and Carol-Renee Modrall in Natural Born Killers (1994)
  • Woody Harrelson and Juliette Lewis in Natural Born Killers (1994)
  • Woody Harrelson and Juliette Lewis in Natural Born Killers (1994)
  • Woody Harrelson in Natural Born Killers (1994)
  • Juliette Lewis and Tom Sizemore in Natural Born Killers (1994)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


20 October 2003 | FilmOtaku
7
| A bizarre acid trip of a film that has good and bad points
Oliver Stone seems to have outdone himself on this one. Not only is Natural Born Killers a visual masterpiece, but it is probably one of the most insane and nonsensical social commentary films I have ever seen. Disappointing, since it was penned by one of my favorite film directors, Mr. Quentin `Bad Motherf***er' Tarantino himself. The elements of a good story are there: Boy meets girl, boy and girl fall in love and go on a mass murdering spree which is lapped up by the media. While there is definitely a strong social statement, the story is too erratic and scattered to be completely coherent.

Visually however, Natural Born Killers is stunning. It is intensely colorful, unflinchingly violent and innovative in its cinematography. This movie is not for most, but if you decide to try it out, be warned: It is not for the faint of heart, and not for the weak of stomach. But it is an important film for its visual merits, at the very least.

--Shelly

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The red glasses Mickey wears during the opening scene of the movie are reminiscent of chicken glasses, tiny red glasses once sold to farmers to keep their chickens from murdering one another. The red glass kept the chickens from seeing the color red, or more specifically, blood. For some strange reason, when chickens see red, they peck at it. If they see red on a chicken in the flock, they gang together and peck at the bloody spot until the offending chicken is dead. Conversely, in that opening scene, once Mickey and Mallory saw red, they didn't stop until almost everyone was dead. Industrialization now keeps chickens pinned up, and incapable of getting at one another, so chicken glasses are no longer used.


Quotes

Mallory: Wherever we go, whatever happens, Mickey, when I look up at the stars, I'll know you'll be lookin' up at the same ones.
Mickey: Same ones, baby.
Mallory: You make every day feel like kindergarten.


Goofs

No human can take such a repeated and concentrated dose of Mace as Mallory does and open their eyes so soon afterward, not to mention Mallory's eyes open quite easily and do not shut during the spray. Mallory also doesn't apply any water to her eyes, and seems to recover naturally only minutes later. This is one of many scenes which are supposed to be stylized and unrealistic.


Crazy Credits

The end credits are superimposed over a vast amount of stock footage, ranging from the future of Mickey and Mallory, stock A-Bomb tests, childhood photos of Mickey and Mallory, time-lapse footage, scenes from the movie, and so on.


Alternate Versions

The Director's Cut features roughly 4 minutes of material removed from the theatrical version prior to release in order to get a R rating. Here are details of the additional scenes, in chronological order:

  • there are three additional shots in the pre-credits scene in the diner. The first is found when Mallory knocks Sonny (Richard Lineback) over the partition. In the theatrical cut, the scene immediately cuts to Sonny's friend (James Gammon) getting up out of his chair to intervene. But in the Director's Cut however, there is an additional shot of Mallory slamming Sonny's head into a table, and blood spraying across the surface of the table. Next, when Mickey slits Sonny's friend's stomach, there are three additional slashes not found in the theatrical cut. Lastly, as Mallory jumps up and down on Sonny's back, there is an additional shot of her grabbing his blood soaked head and pounding it into the ground;
  • the death of Ed Wilson (Rodney Dangerfield) has one additional shot as Wilson is leaning up against the wall prior to being dunked into the fish-tank, and Mickey hits him with the tire-iron across the back of the head;
  • as Mallory drives to the garage after arguing with Mickey about the hostage (Corinna Laszlo), there is a brief shot of Mickey raping the hostage in the motel room;
  • Jack Scagnetti's (Tom Sizemore) murder of Pinky (Lorraine Farris) contains an additional shot of Scagnetti with his hands around her throat and her struggling underneath him, whilst he keeps on saying to her, "I'm only kidding, I'm only kidding";
  • when Mickey kills the pharmacist (Glen Chin) at DrugZone, there are two additional shots; one showing the pharmacist's blood spraying onto the glass divide, the other showing the clerk falling to his knees and dying;
  • the scene where the police beat up Mallory outside the pharmacist contains a few extra shots of policemen punching her;
  • as Mickey attempts to kill the guards in the cell after the interview has been terminated, there are several additional shots showing members of Wayne Gale's (Robert Downey Jr.) crew being shot and killed;
  • after Mickey has taken control of the TV crew, he 'persuades' Kavanaugh (Pruitt Taylor Vince) to come with them by breaking his fingers;
  • the prison riot sequences contain numerous additional shots. Four particularly obvious ones are: a guard is shoved into a washing machine, which is then turned on; a guard has his head pushed in under a steam press; a guard is thrown into an industrial oven; a guard is flung from the top story of the prison;
  • the scene where Scagnetti sprays mace in Mallory's eyes is longer, with a more sustained spraying, whilst the guards hit her;
  • a tracking shot in a barber's during the riot show inmates slitting the throats of other inmates;
  • during the riot, the scene where the prisoner throws a stick of dynamite into a door way is extended; after the dynamite has been thrown, there is a shot of the explosion and a prisoner being flung from the room and rebounding off the wall;
  • in the scene where Mickey rescues Mallory from Jack Scagnetti, there are additional shots of the bullets hitting the guards;
  • there are more shots of Jack Scagnetti trashing about on the ground after being stabbed, prior to being shot;
  • when Mallory holds the gun to Scagnetti's head and asks him if he still wants her, in the theatrical version, she pulls the trigger immediately. In the Director's Cut, there is a shot of Scagnetti screaming;
  • as Mickey, Mallory, and the others flee Mallory's cell, they are ambushed, and Wayne Gale's crew is wiped out. In the theatrical version, little is seen of this, but in the Director's Cut, there are clear shots of his crew being gunned down, especially Julie (Terrylene), who is killed in slow motion;
  • during the standoff at the stairs, Dwight McClusky (Tommy Lee Jones) orders the guards to open fire at Mickey because Kavanaugh (Pruitt Taylor Vince), who Mickey is using as a shield, is already dead. In the theatrical version, when McClusky gives the order to fire, there is an awkward cut to Mallory holding Wayne Gale, and the guards never fire. In the Director's Cut, the guards open fire, riddling Kavanaugh's (still living) body with bullets.
  • after Mallory shoots Wayne Gale's hand, there is a brief shot through the hole created by the bullet, looking down at McClusky;
  • McClusky's death is far more explicit. After being dragged down from the gate by the inmates, in the theatrical version, we never see him again, but in the Director's Cut, after a moment, a prisoner raises a spear, with McClusky's severed head perched on top;
  • Wayne Gale's death scene is longer and includes more shots of the bullets hitting him;
  • numerous additional shots of the subliminal demons are scattered throughout the film.


Soundtracks

The Rhythm of the Heat
Written and Performed by
Peter Gabriel
Courtesy of Peter Gabriel Ltd./Geffen Records and Virgin Records Ltd.

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Crime | Drama

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