Natural Born Killers (1994)

R   |    |  Action, Crime, Drama


Natural Born Killers (1994) Poster

Two victims of traumatized childhoods become lovers and psychopathic serial murderers irresponsibly glorified by the mass media.


7.3/10
216,586

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


13 March 2006 | CarsonTrent
10
| It will blow your mind!
This is a big, loud, colorful tragicomic and articulate satire on human society, media, politics and the most inner desire and organic need of man to destroy. There has been criticism on the high content of violence, and has been categorized as instigating, but it's actually quite obvious that it's just a satiric view of contemporary "personal success" driven society. All characters are natural born killers, not only the ones doing the actual killing. They are all shown as predators with no morals, who will do anything to achieve their goals. The movie will take you flying, smash your brains and feast your eyes..., it will feed your senses, it will make you love it and hate it. Combining the brilliant early writing skills of Tarantino, Oliver Stone's addiction to violence with the brilliant performance of Woody Harrelson, Juliette Lewis, and all the supporting cast(Rodney Dangerfield, Robert Downey Jr, Tom Sizemore and Tommy Lee Jones). Fantastic soundtrack and graphics. It's THE eye opener. The ultimate 90's movie.

It's a ride!

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



Did You Know?

Trivia

No prison in the United States would ever broadcast an interview like the one Gale does with Mickey to the general population of the prision, for the very reason that it might cause a riot.


Quotes

Ed Wilson: I'll show her a little tenderness, after I eat. When I get up there, she won't see my face for an hour.


Goofs

When Scagnetti is with the prostitute, as he starts to choke her and they roll off the bed, he is seen wearing a thong with just a string in back. When he gets up and is seen standing by the window, his underwear has changed into briefs.


Crazy Credits

The end credits are superimposed over a vast amount of stock footage, ranging from the future of Mickey and Mallory, stock A-Bomb tests, childhood photos of Mickey and Mallory, time-lapse footage, scenes from the movie, and so on.


Alternate Versions

The Director's Cut features roughly 4 minutes of material removed from the theatrical version prior to release in order to get a R rating. Here are details of the additional scenes, in chronological order:

  • there are three additional shots in the pre-credits scene in the diner. The first is found when Mallory knocks Sonny (Richard Lineback) over the partition. In the theatrical cut, the scene immediately cuts to Sonny's friend (James Gammon) getting up out of his chair to intervene. But in the Director's Cut however, there is an additional shot of Mallory slamming Sonny's head into a table, and blood spraying across the surface of the table. Next, when Mickey slits Sonny's friend's stomach, there are three additional slashes not found in the theatrical cut. Lastly, as Mallory jumps up and down on Sonny's back, there is an additional shot of her grabbing his blood soaked head and pounding it into the ground;
  • the death of Ed Wilson (Rodney Dangerfield) has one additional shot as Wilson is leaning up against the wall prior to being dunked into the fish-tank, and Mickey hits him with the tire-iron across the back of the head;
  • as Mallory drives to the garage after arguing with Mickey about the hostage (Corinna Laszlo), there is a brief shot of Mickey raping the hostage in the motel room;
  • Jack Scagnetti's (Tom Sizemore) murder of Pinky (Lorraine Farris) contains an additional shot of Scagnetti with his hands around her throat and her struggling underneath him, whilst he keeps on saying to her, "I'm only kidding, I'm only kidding";
  • when Mickey kills the pharmacist (Glen Chin) at DrugZone, there are two additional shots; one showing the pharmacist's blood spraying onto the glass divide, the other showing the clerk falling to his knees and dying;
  • the scene where the police beat up Mallory outside the pharmacist contains a few extra shots of policemen punching her;
  • as Mickey attempts to kill the guards in the cell after the interview has been terminated, there are several additional shots showing members of Wayne Gale's (Robert Downey Jr.) crew being shot and killed;
  • after Mickey has taken control of the TV crew, he 'persuades' Kavanaugh (Pruitt Taylor Vince) to come with them by breaking his fingers;
  • the prison riot sequences contain numerous additional shots. Four particularly obvious ones are: a guard is shoved into a washing machine, which is then turned on; a guard has his head pushed in under a steam press; a guard is thrown into an industrial oven; a guard is flung from the top story of the prison;
  • the scene where Scagnetti sprays mace in Mallory's eyes is longer, with a more sustained spraying, whilst the guards hit her;
  • a tracking shot in a barber's during the riot show inmates slitting the throats of other inmates;
  • during the riot, the scene where the prisoner throws a stick of dynamite into a door way is extended; after the dynamite has been thrown, there is a shot of the explosion and a prisoner being flung from the room and rebounding off the wall;
  • in the scene where Mickey rescues Mallory from Jack Scagnetti, there are additional shots of the bullets hitting the guards;
  • there are more shots of Jack Scagnetti trashing about on the ground after being stabbed, prior to being shot;
  • when Mallory holds the gun to Scagnetti's head and asks him if he still wants her, in the theatrical version, she pulls the trigger immediately. In the Director's Cut, there is a shot of Scagnetti screaming;
  • as Mickey, Mallory, and the others flee Mallory's cell, they are ambushed, and Wayne Gale's crew is wiped out. In the theatrical version, little is seen of this, but in the Director's Cut, there are clear shots of his crew being gunned down, especially Julie (Terrylene), who is killed in slow motion;
  • during the standoff at the stairs, Dwight McClusky (Tommy Lee Jones) orders the guards to open fire at Mickey because Kavanaugh (Pruitt Taylor Vince), who Mickey is using as a shield, is already dead. In the theatrical version, when McClusky gives the order to fire, there is an awkward cut to Mallory holding Wayne Gale, and the guards never fire. In the Director's Cut, the guards open fire, riddling Kavanaugh's (still living) body with bullets.
  • after Mallory shoots Wayne Gale's hand, there is a brief shot through the hole created by the bullet, looking down at McClusky;
  • McClusky's death is far more explicit. After being dragged down from the gate by the inmates, in the theatrical version, we never see him again, but in the Director's Cut, after a moment, a prisoner raises a spear, with McClusky's severed head perched on top;
  • Wayne Gale's death scene is longer and includes more shots of the bullets hitting him;
  • numerous additional shots of the subliminal demons are scattered throughout the film.


Soundtracks

La Vie en Rose
Music by
Louiguy
French lyrics by Édith Piaf
English lyrics by Mack David
Performed by Victor Young and His Singing Strings
Courtesy of MCA Records

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Action | Crime | Drama

Details

Release Date:

26 August 1994

Language

English, Navajo, Japanese


Country of Origin

USA

Filming Locations

Las Vegas, New Mexico, USA

Box Office

Budget:

$34,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$11,166,687 28 August 1994

Gross USA:

$50,282,766

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$50,283,563

Contribute to this page

IMDb Picks: Our Most Anticipated Movies of 2021

The IMDb editors have selected the films they're most excited to see in 2021. Have you added these movies to your Watchlist?

Browse our picks

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com