Batman Forever (1995)

PG-13   |    |  Action, Adventure, Fantasy


Batman Forever (1995) Poster

Batman must battle former district attorney Harvey Dent, who is now Two-Face and Edward Nygma, The Riddler with help from an amorous psychologist and a young circus acrobat who becomes his sidekick, Robin.


5.4/10
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  • Drew Barrymore in Batman Forever (1995)
  • Faye Dunaway at an event for Batman Forever (1995)
  • Batman Forever (1995)
  • Tommy Lee Jones in Batman Forever (1995)
  • Val Kilmer and Chris O'Donnell in Batman Forever (1995)
  • Drew Barrymore in Batman Forever (1995)

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User Reviews


6 August 2017 | minra90
Much better than Batman & Robin
Batman Forever was clearly targeted for the more younger audience, and it did a very good job at that. I remember watching this as a child, and I enjoyed every moment of it from start to finish. The film was entertaining. Robin was great, and the villains especially the Riddler was amazing. Honestly, it was the Riddler that stole the show, and had it not been for Jim Carrey's performance, the film would've lost a lot of limelight; in other words, it would've almost been bad as Batman & Robin. Jim Carrey literally stole the show. The film is overly criticised, but there's no reason for it – really! I'm surprised how the director managed to get actors such as Carrey, Clooney and Arnold to participate in a superhero film due to their status and calibre. All in all, Batman Forever is slightly underrated, and is a good Batman film. Fantastic to watch during the 90s.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

First live action appearance of Harvey Dent/Two-Face in disfigured form. He was supposed to appear as a villain in the television show Batman (1966), reimagined as a news anchor who was disfigured when a television set exploded in his face, but the character didn't appear in the series, and Clint Eastwood expressed an interest for the role. Early drafts of Batman Returns (1992) featured Harvey Dent in the film (with Billy Dee Williams reprising his role from Batman (1989)), and his transformation into Two-Face was set to happen during the finale when Catwoman kisses him while holding onto the Penguin's generator. Several elements of Dent's role in these early drafts of that film were incorporated to the character of Max Shreck.


Quotes

The Riddler: Riddle me this, riddle me that, who's afraid of the big, black bat?


Goofs

Two-Face's plan to hold the circus hostage unless Batman gives himself up doesn't make a whole lot of sense. If Batman never revealed himself and if Robin hadn't been able to throw the bomb into the river everyone in the circus would have died including Two-Face's thugs who had not yet evacuated the building. Even if the thugs had begun evacuating (the way the scene is shot it is hard to tell) there is no way they ever would have been able to get clear of the blast radius in time and Two - Face himself even though had escaped through a trap door still would have been killed as the entire surface would have collapsed in on him. It's highly unlikely this was intended to be a suicide mission meaning that Two-Face and his entire gang hadn't thought things through all the way.


Crazy Credits

The main title "Batman" never actually appears onscreen. It is instead represented by a bat logo with the rest of the title, "Forever," superimposed on top of it.


Alternate Versions

Large sequences of the movie were deleted to trim the movie down to two hours. The red journal that was left by Bruce's father contained words that deepened his guilt ("Bruces insists we see a movie tonight...") and made him feel responsible for his parent's death. After Bruce is knocked unconscious during the attack on Wayne Manor, he loses his memory and does not recall ever being Batman, but is haunted by a terrible guilt. To face his fear, Bruce ventures into the heart of the cave where the journal is, and reads the end of the sentence that cleanses his guilt ("but Martha and I have our hearts set on Zorro, so Bruce's movie will have to wait for next week") The giant bat then appears, and Bruce stands eye to eye with it. After his memory returns, Bruce triggers a hidden button that reveals a second layer to the batcave, where the Batwing, Batboat, and the experimental sonar suit were kept (thus explaining why they escaped Riddler's wrath).


Soundtracks

Bad Days
Written by
Wayne Coyne (as Coyne), Michael Ivins (as Ivins), Steven Drozd (as Drozd), and Ronald Jones (as Jones)
Produced and Performed by The Flaming Lips
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc.

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Action | Adventure | Fantasy

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