The House of Yes (1997)

R   |    |  Comedy, Drama


The House of Yes (1997) Poster

A mentally unbalanced young woman - who is convinced she is Jackie Kennedy - flies into a murderous rage when her brother returns home to reveal he is engaged.


6.6/10
7,338

Videos


Photos

  • Parker Posey and Freddie Prinze Jr. in The House of Yes (1997)
  • Parker Posey in The House of Yes (1997)
  • Mark Waters in The House of Yes (1997)
  • Geneviève Bujold at an event for The House of Yes (1997)
  • Parker Posey at an event for The House of Yes (1997)
  • Tori Spelling and Josh Hamilton in The House of Yes (1997)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


27 January 2004 | MilesKeatonAndrew
8
| House of Fun for the sick-minded and perverse
The House of Yes is one of my personal favorites. Is it creepy? Yes. Is it funny? No - it's hysterical, at least to those of us accustomed to laughing at things you're not supposed to laugh about - like bizarre social taboo. Younger indie fans may not care for this flick, but The House of Yes is not to be compared with the likes of Chasing Amy. For Parker Posey fans, the film is apples to the oranges of Party Girl, Henry Fool, Clockwatchers, etc.

The House of Yes was adapted from Wendy McLeod's play, so it is a dialogue film with its own language - similar to the Coens' Miller's Crossing. As with Miller's Crossing, the snappy dialogue never misses. While watching The House of Yes, I've caught myself rewinding to catch a phrase I missed because I was still laughing a the preceding gag.

Facial closeups dominate this film, and for reason - the actors' expressions are more telling than the dialogue, delivered flawlessly by every member of the crew - looks you could spread onto a cracker, like when Mama (Bujold) warns her son Marty about Jackie-O's mental state: "I'm going to baste the turkey, and hide the kitchen knives."

The film's biggest surprise: Tori Spelling, as a prudish and naiive Pennsylvanian - perhaps her most believable role to date.

If there were a Cooperstown for comedic acting, this film alone puts Parker Posey into the Hall of Fame.

Highly recommended for the sick-minded and perverse.

Miles Keaton Andrew

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



This Week on TV: "The Flash," "Limetown," and More

Plan your week of TV watching with our list of all the new originals, adaptations, and "double" features you can't miss.

Watch our video

Featured on IMDb

Check out the action from New York Comic Con check out what IMDb editors are watching this month, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com