L.A. Confidential (1997)

R   |    |  Crime, Drama, Mystery


L.A. Confidential (1997) Poster

As corruption grows in 1950s Los Angeles, three policemen -- one strait-laced, one brutal, and one sleazy -- investigate a series of murders with their own brand of justice.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

8.3/10
488,170

Videos


Photos

  • Kevin Spacey in L.A. Confidential (1997)
  • Kevin Spacey in L.A. Confidential (1997)
  • Danny DeVito in L.A. Confidential (1997)
  • Russell Crowe in L.A. Confidential (1997)
  • Julie Cypher and Melissa Etheridge at an event for L.A. Confidential (1997)
  • James Coburn at an event for L.A. Confidential (1997)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


11 January 2000 | Giuseppe Giuseppe
10
| Everything in this film is fantastic.
L.A. Confidential is, without a doubt, the best film of the 1990s, and quite possibly one of the best films ever made.

As with any great film, it all starts with the writing. The story is riveting, the dialogue is smart and quite funny, and the characters are written in three dimensions.

The acting is phenomenal. Perhaps a bigger tragedy than L.A. Confidential's loss to Titanic in the Best Picture race is that none of the three lead actors even garnered nominations. Russell Crowe, Guy Pearce, and Kevin Spacey are absolutely phenomenal; it is their characters that drive this fascinating story about police corruption in 1950s Los Angeles. We get to know these people, to understand who they are and why they do what they do, and to root for them to overcome their imperfections.

The directing is fantastic. Curtis Hanson doesn't shove anything in the audience's face; instead, he allows the audience to discover the film's nuances on their own. (That makes this an excellent film for repeat viewings, you truly catch something new every time). 1950s Los Angeles is reproduced beautifully. The editing is quick and seamless, the music is perfect for the film (Hanson should teach other directors how to do a montage effectively), and the cinematography is great.

I can't find a negative thing to say about this film. It's truly a masterpiece.

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



More Like This

  • Heat

    Heat

  • Casino

    Casino

  • Snatch

    Snatch

  • American Beauty

    American Beauty

  • Scarface

    Scarface

  • The Usual Suspects

    The Usual Suspects

  • Taxi Driver

    Taxi Driver

  • Good Will Hunting

    Good Will Hunting

  • Chinatown

    Chinatown

  • Unforgiven

    Unforgiven

  • No Country for Old Men

    No Country for Old Men

  • Reservoir Dogs

    Reservoir Dogs

Did You Know?

Trivia

Guy Pearce didn't like the cop with whom he rode around, finding him to be racist. He got more from 1950s police training films, which featured the kind of rigid stiffness that he was seeking to bring to his character.


Quotes

Sid Hudgens: Come to Los Angeles! The sun shines bright, the beaches are wide and inviting, and the orange groves stretch as far as the eye can see. There are jobs aplenty, and land is cheap. Every working man can have his own house, and inside every house, a ...


Goofs

At the start, just after Ed Exley is interviewed, Edmund Exley and Dudley Smith walk down the stairs of the police station where Dudley picks up two drinks. He hands one to Ed and the other for himself. When Dudley walks away, his has disappeared.


Crazy Credits

At the end of all the credits, there is a brief scene from "Badge of Honor" featuring a onscreen dedication in honor of Sgt. Jack Vincennes (Kevin Spacey), who within the film had served as the "Hollywood cop" and advisor to the film. The scene shows a black-and-white closing moment of "Badge of Honor" with the credits inscribed as "Dedicated to Sgt. Jack Vincennes," as Badge of Honor actor (Matt McCoy) closes the door on the HOMICIDE office and walks sorrowfully away.


Alternate Versions

In the Hong Kong television version, during the scene where Bud breaks into the interrogation room, the part where he removes all the bullets from the gun but one is removed for some reason. So it cuts straight from his coming into the room and then sticking the gun into the rapist's mouth without giving it a Russian roulette feel.


Soundtracks

Silver Bells
(1950)
Written by
Jay Livingston and Ray Evans

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Crime | Drama | Mystery | Thriller

"The Village" Star Picks Her "Seinfeld" Spirit Animal

Get to know Moran Atias, star of the new NBC series "The Village," as she reveals the "Seinfeld" character she most relates to and shares why A Star Is Born always makes her cry.

Watch now

Featured on IMDb

Check out our guide to superheroes, horror movies, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com