The Postman (1997)

R   |    |  Action, Adventure, Drama


The Postman (1997) Poster

A nameless drifter dons a postman's uniform and bag of mail as he begins a quest to inspire hope to the survivors living in post-apocalyptic America.


6.1/10
67,860


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  • Kevin Costner and Olivia Williams in The Postman (1997)
  • Kevin Costner and Larenz Tate in The Postman (1997)
  • Olivia Williams at an event for The Postman (1997)
  • Peggy Lipton and Kidada Jones at an event for The Postman (1997)
  • Clint Eastwood at an event for The Postman (1997)
  • Kevin Costner and Larenz Tate in The Postman (1997)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


19 February 2000 | A-Ron-2
8
| Well... I am glad to see that I am not the only person who liked this film
I truly do NOT understand why The Postman was attacked as viscously as it was by the film media (there films much more worthy of the Golden Raspberry Awards in 1997). I loved this film and was very impressed with the loving amount of dedication that it demonstrates on the part of the actors, writers and director. This was a GOOD movie: it had a strong and intelligent story; excellent and interesting characters; and real feel for the post-Apocalypse genre. I felt that Kevin Costner's everyman act worked beautifully in this film and created a sense of reality for the character and of his situation.

As far as the sci-fi novel by David Brin, this film exceeded it in every way possible. Where Brin had to rely on cheezy sci-fi standards (like supersoldiers) to resolve his story, this film does using only two men, both frauds, and both with radically different understandings of what constitutes a proper society. That is what made this film great (and I rarely use the term great), that this film was essentially an examination of America and what America means. It was a parable of sorts about the types of men Americans are and what they are capable of (notice that the head bad-guy had a traditional, classical education, while Costner did not; he appreciated these things but they were not at the center of his belief system... I wonder why).

While I do not agree with every aspect of this film (I am a Medievalist and a Platonist, so I don't necessarily feel the same way about the Western Canon that the film-maker may have), I still find it to be a beautiful reflection on the psyche of the American everyman. America has a tradition of rejecting the absolutist ideals of the past in favor of the pragmatic relativism of today, and I think that this film is a parable of the divorce of America from the traditions of Europe.

Overall, this is a complex and entertaining film and I highly recommend it to anyone interested in examinations of American culture and tradition, perhaps as a double feature with Citizen Cane (I am not, however, claiming that the Postman was as good a film as Citizen Cane, only that they have a similar theme... what does it mean to be an American?).

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Details

Release Date:

25 December 1997

Language

English


Country of Origin

USA

Filming Locations

Amado, Arizona, USA

Box Office

Budget:

$80,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$5,260,324 28 December 1997

Gross USA:

$17,626,234

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$17,626,234

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