Dogma (1999)

R   |    |  Adventure, Comedy, Drama


Dogma (1999) Poster

An abortion clinic worker with a special heritage is called upon to save the existence of humanity from being negated by two renegade angels trying to exploit a loop-hole and reenter Heaven.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

7.3/10
198,527

Videos


Photos

  • Dogma (1999)
  • Linda Fiorentino and Alan Rickman in Dogma (1999)
  • Ben Affleck at an event for Dogma (1999)
  • Ben Affleck and Kevin Smith at an event for Dogma (1999)
  • Janeane Garofalo in Dogma (1999)
  • Ben Affleck at an event for Dogma (1999)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Cast & Crew

Top Billed Cast



Director:

Kevin Smith

Writer:

Kevin Smith

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


25 February 2008 | Movie_Muse_Reviews
6
| Great concept, adequate execution, likable movie
"Dogma" isn't the kind of comedy that most people will find themselves holding onto their guts during. It's more the second-long "ha!" kind of comedy.

That simply means Kevin Smith's writing is clever enough to the point where you will be pleasantly shocked by some of the conversations and events of the film and think it all rather amusing and humorous. It's not hilarious, it's just clever and a bit funny.

The premise is rather interesting and surprisingly from a more fantasy-esquire genre than Smith traditionally dabbles with. Loki (Matt Damon) and Bartleby (Ben Affleck) are more or less fallen angels that have found a way back into heaven. They must be stopped or the world will come to a screeching halt, so a seemingly random protagonist named Bethany gets charged by God to stop them. Simple, but the slick, nonchalant approach to religion keeps the satire rampant.

The film does spend a lot of its time explaining itself, which isn't too bad considering Smith keeps the explanations to-the-point and allows the characters to stay interesting in the process. Chris Rock, who plays an apostle, and Alan Rickman, who plays God's messenger/ voice are two of these characters that are both good in the film and Smith has allowed to maintain their character's edge despite lines upon lines of explanation.

Getting from point A to point B and so on is not the film's strength. The physical events that take place are ultimately boring and unexciting. It's the moments along the way, the conversations and the philosophy that come about, that make it successful. Affleck's character raises a lot of interesting religious questions about humanity and his conversation with the protagonist on the train is rather insightful. In general, Smith has used Bethany as a way to keep the viewers skepticism of the plot active in the film. She keeps it from getting preposterous. In general, the whole cast is very talented and their characters well written, which keeps the film interesting.

It's not the funniest or most interesting comedy in terms of plot and the sequence of events, but "Dogma" is a smart concept that ultimately results in a sharp satire and some great thoughts that scrutinize religion in a way that never seems too out of line.

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



Our Favorite Trailers of the Week

See the trailers we loved this week, including "Jessica Jones" Season 3, and Brittany Runs a Marathon. Presented by Microsoft Surface.

Watch our trailer of trailers

Featured on IMDb

See what TV shows editors are excited about this month and check out our guide to Star Wars, video games, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com