Fantastic Four (I) (2005)

PG-13   |    |  Action, Adventure, Fantasy


Fantastic Four (2005) Poster

A group of astronauts gain superpowers after a cosmic radiation exposure and must use them to oppose the plans of their enemy, Doctor Victor Von Doom.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

5.7/10
294,662

Videos


Photos

  • Chris Evans at an event for Fantastic Four (2005)
  • Tim Story in Fantastic Four (2005)
  • Anand Jon at an event for Fantastic Four (2005)
  • Jessica Alba in Fantastic Four (2005)
  • Jessica Alba and Ioan Gruffudd in Fantastic Four (2005)
  • Chris Evans in Fantastic Four (2005)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


13 August 2015 | StevePulaski
7
| Captures a time when superhero films were more joyful
Fantastic Four is one of the last superhero films, that I can recall, that wasn't insufferably bleak or incredibly serious to a point where any shred of humor was seen as obtuse to the film's narrative. Yes, Christopher Nolan's Batman trilogy is an indisputable breakthrough in superhero films, but it also made the seriousness of superhero films standard, something that would follow into the late 2000's and early 2010's as Marvel built up The Avengers. Fantastic Four reminds of the quirkiness superhero films were once predicated upon, and while it may get a bit too corny at times, and its focus can never really settle, it's also a very commercial film that satisfies on some level of entertainment when it gives every card in its deck a fair time to shine.

We open by looking at a physicist named Dr. Reed Richards (Ioan Gruffudd), who is convinced evolution was triggered millions of years ago by stray elements of cosmic energy in space, some of which will pass near Earth very soon. His pal, astronaut Ben Grimm (Michael Chiklis), works by his side on this potentially revolutionary discovery by helping him convince their old classmate Dr. Victor Von Doom (Julian McMahon), the CEO of Von Doom Industries, to allow both of them access to his private space station to further experiment with the effects of these cosmic energy particles. While Doom agrees, he winds up walking away with most of the profits that this experiment will bring, affirming Reed's desperation to make his project work.

Still, he persists on and brings his close friends Susan Storm (Jessica Alba) and her brother Johnny (Chris Evans) along for the ride. However, when a trip to outer space goes awry, exposure with the cosmic energy results in the four receiving deformities and enhanced human abilities that have never before been seen: Reed possesses the ability to stretch every limb of his body, Susan has the ability to disappear and reappear at her leisure, Johnny can have his body engulfed in flame simply by reciting the phrase "Flame on!," and Ben turns into a hideous, orange rock monster.

Following the four's mutations, writers Michael France and Mark Frost focus a great deal of their time on the agony that these mutations bring, particularly The Thing, who experiences his wife leaving him shortly after revealing his deformity. While this agony is a solid angle (one I'd argue necessary in most superhero films), too much of the time is spent profiling The Thing and not enough on the remaining characters of the film. Reed and Ben, who are ultimately the film's main focus, wind up monopolizing too much of the picture, and any time we see Johnny is when he's right in the middle of making a smug comment or being his typical, womanizing self.

The action in Fantastic Four has a colorful commercial look to it, brilliantly bold and very vibrant in a way that makes many of the scenes pop with life. It manages to achieve a comic book aesthetic without resorting to picture-in-picture editing. One particularly involving scene takes place on a suspension bridge, where The Thing is seen pummeling everything in his sight and the remaining three members of the team must resort to either relaxing him or protecting drivers and innocent bystanders.

The goofiness in Fantastic Four, however, in an age of dark superhero films that come with slick aesthetics and brooding characters, is a delightful change of pace. Yes, there is a point when one wishes director Tim Story, France, and Frost would command a tighter grip on the seriousness of the writing, but the pulpy fun of Fantastic Four, in addition to the effects and the neatly choreographed action, keep it a moving, satisfying spectacle that is more than just colors flying around on screen, trying to find their place.

Starring: Ioan Gruffudd, Jessica Alba, Chris Evans, Michael Chiklis, and Julian McMahon. Directed by: Tim Story.

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



More Like This

  • Fantastic 4: Rise of the Silver Surfer

    Fantastic 4: Rise of the Silver Surfer

  • Ghost Rider

    Ghost Rider

  • Hulk

    Hulk

  • Green Lantern

    Green Lantern

  • Daredevil

    Daredevil

  • Fantastic Four

    Fantastic Four

  • Elektra

    Elektra

  • Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance

    Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance

  • The Incredible Hulk

    The Incredible Hulk

  • Spider-Man 3

    Spider-Man 3

  • Spider-Man 2

    Spider-Man 2

  • X-Men: The Last Stand

    X-Men: The Last Stand

Did You Know?

Trivia

Patrick Wilson auditioned for a role in this film.


Quotes

Ben Grimm: Typical of Victor Von Doom to build a 30 foot statue of himself.


Goofs

The first time Johnny Storm actually flies and he whoops, his 4 logo is on the right side of his chest and reversed as if the sequence has been flipped.


Crazy Credits

The Marvel Comics logo features comic-book images of the Fantastic Four in its pages; it's also shaded blue, the uniform color of the Four.


Alternate Versions

The Airline version is slightly different. The following difference's include:

  • Instead of the talk Sue and Reed have on the bridge, they're in a Planetarium instead.
  • During the final confrontation with Dr. Doom, Thing knocks open a fire hydrant and Mr. Fantastic puts his body in an "S" shape to amplify the water, instead in this version it cuts to Thing using his foot as if he did everything himself.
  • The scene where Victor opens the energy globe and puts his arm in it to increase power, large bolts of electricity jump out in the theatrical version, in this version, there are no bolts of electricity, indicating the effects were not finished.
  • The scene where Reed proposes to Sue on the boat, he just stands up normally and delivers his proposal with a different acting take.He doesn't kneel down while still standing as he did in the theatrical version.
  • Some shots of crashing cars on the bridge were cut.
  • Some language was cut, mostly reference's to God.
  • The scene where Victor picks up his phone and says " Leonard, bring Ben Grimm to the Baxter Building " was changed to " Leonard, bring me my Lab Rat ".
  • The Death of Victors' boss is slightly edited.
  • The scene where Thing walks into the bar has a different song playing and the glasses don't shake, nor does the record skip in this version.
  • During the scene where Sue, Reed and Johnny are taking a cab to the Brooklyn Bridge we hear a voice-over of Reed saying " Ben told us to meet him here at the Brooklyn Bridge " after this voice over it cuts to the three of them in the car.
  • This does not happen in the theatrical version.
  • During the scene where Johnny puts a shirt on and burns it and tells Reed and Sue he has " a serious problem " we can actually hear him yell off-screen and also hear flames shoot out as well before he informs then of what happened. In the Theatrical Version we just see his burnt shirt and the following line.
  • Although the film was shot in the Super 35 process, this version Pans and Scans as if it were shot in Anamorphic Widescreen instead of properly framing it for Full Frame as most Super 35 films are.


Soundtracks

Goodbye to You
Written by Justin Rimer with Brett Erickson and Ben Schigel
Performed by Breaking Point
Courtesy of Wind-Up Records, LLC

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Action | Adventure | Fantasy | Sci-Fi

Why Ricky Whittle Really Needs to Use His Imagination

"American Gods" star Ricky Whittle shares how he brings Shadow Moon to life, with some help from producer Neil Gaiman, a wild imagination, and some impressive CGI.

Watch now

Featured on IMDb

Check out our guide to the SXSW 2019, what to watch on TV, and a look back at the 2018-2019 awards season.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com