The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)

PG-13   |    |  Adventure, Drama, Fantasy


The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001) Poster

A meek Hobbit from the Shire and eight companions set out on a journey to destroy the powerful One Ring and save Middle-earth from the Dark Lord Sauron.

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  • Ian Holm in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)
  • The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)
  • Ian McKellen in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)
  • Ian Holm at an event for The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)
  • Dominic Monaghan at an event for The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)
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User Reviews


8 October 2002 | Rinaear
Embrace the magic
It is with no surprise that Peter Jackson's The Fellowship of the Ring film has received such mixed critics. Many viewers refer to it as being childish, boring and uninteresting. Seems to me that it is bound to the same fate of Tolkien's books, destined to be a target for the same type of misunderstandings that keep attacking this literary masterpiece many decades after it's first publication.

Having read the books several years ago, I went to see this `impossible' film when it came out with many doubts on my mind. I really liked it, but left the theater with as many doubts as I had before. Was it perfect? Well, maybe not, but what an achievement. After watching it a few times on DVD, and thinking about it for some time now, I find myself loving this film more and more. Let me tell you why...

The Lord of the Rings is a fairy-tale of myth and fantasy. Peter Jackson directed a film that was considered, for a very long time, impossible to make, and not only for technical reasons. The narrative roots are incredibly long and detailed, and the storyline is deeply connected with the creation of a fantastic continent from a time unknown called `Middle Earth'. It's author, Tolkien, dedicated a considerable part of his life developing this continent's background, it's mythology and origins, it's different kinds of people, cultures and languages, and therefore it's geographic references are determinant to the unfolding of the story of the One Ring.

Peter Jackson went out to achieve the impossible and came out with a recreation of the original that is pure and true to the story in every detail. The first time the four hobbits meet a black rider on the road, for example, is absolutely faithful to the feeling of the book. The assault of the riders at Weathertop is another great example, and it captures that feeling of danger, density and atmosphere that are the main characteristics of the tale. Jackson also took some liberties with the story, and made some right choices along the way. If the so called `purists' may not approve the removal of Tom Bombadil altogether, it should be comprehensible that the travel from Hobbiton to Rivendel is a very long and detailed one and could easily make a movie on it's own. I felt more uneasy with how short the Council of Elrond was. In the book, the council is where the whole story of the rings is first explained, and many passages from the past ages of Middle Earth are unveiled. It is a fascinating moment of the story, that had to be shortened for obvious reasons. Still, after some consideration, I now agree with the options made by Peter Jackson, and think that the movie prologue narrated by Galadriel was the wisest choice. The magic is all there when Gandalf shuts his eyes the moment Frodo stands in the council and says `I will take the ring'. It is there at Moria's Gate, and at the fall of Boromir. It is a powerful film that doesn't fit the rhythm of the standard Hollywood action movie. It is a film that breeds, that takes time to unfold, it's tale branching in every direction.

I could go on and on, talking about all the different elements that bring this film close to perfection, but I'll end saying that deep down, this is not about action, beards and big monsters. The greatest thing about this film, to me, is that it brought me back to a time when I was in love with a different world where everything was possible. Reading The Lord of the Rings night after night, I came to understand what this thing of `mankind' really was all about. The corruption of absolute power, the importance and value of friendship, the inevitability of growing up, the strength of hope... That this film could capture that magic, and be a new bearer to it's message of humanism, is a statement to it's greatness. Gandalf's words, that even the smallest person may change the course of the world, and have a part to play in the destiny of all, are immortal.

In the end, this is a wonderful film, but that doesn't mean you are going to like it. I cannot tell you what it is like to see this film if you don't know or love the book. But I hope it may plant a seed on your heart to discover a great world of fantasy, beauty and humanity. I believe Tolkien would have liked that.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Featured two actors who have played James Bond villains: Sir Christopher Lee in The Man with the Golden Gun (1974), and Sean Bean in GoldenEye (1995).


Quotes

Galadriel: The world is changed. I feel it in the water. I feel it in the earth. I smell it in the air. Much that once was is lost, for none now live who remember it. It began with the forging of the Great Rings. Three were given to the Elves, immortal, wisest...


Goofs

When the hobbits first see Aragorn his beard is shaved down but when Aragorn saw Frodo disappear and took him into a private room his beard is fully grown.


Crazy Credits

After the end credits, the DVD and Blu Ray editions of the extended cut feature a list of "Lord of the Rings fan-club members" who contributed financially to the project in exchange for a credit. This additional credit sequence lasts 20 minutes.


Alternate Versions

The Extended Edition DVD includes the following changes to the film.

  • During the prologue, more is shown of the ambush and death of Isildur, emphasizing his betrayal by the Ring.
  • After the prologue, we open with a close-up of the Middle Earth map and pan to hear Bilbo writing his book, starting with a description of hobbits. Much of the Gandalf-Frodo dialog in their first scene together is removed, including the subtitle "60 Years Later".
  • When Gandalf and Bilbo are in Bag End, Bilbo notes that the people knocking on his door are the Sackville-Bagginses.
  • During the party, Bilbo greets a guest, then hides from the S.B's with Frodo. He tells Frodo how much the latter means to him.
  • After the Ringwraiths set out, the Hobbits (prominently Merry and Pippin) are shown dancing and singing in the Green Dragon Inn. References are made to troubles in the outside world and Frodo encourages Sam to pursue a relationship with Rosie Cotton.
  • After Frodo and Sam set out, they hear singing and find the woodelves leaving for the Gray Havens.
  • After the company leaves Bree, they pass through the Midgewater Marshes. Later, Aragorn brings a killed deer to the hobbits. Frodo wakes up late at night to hear Aragorn singing about Beren and Luthien.
  • The stone trolls from "The Hobbit" are shown.
  • Additional dialog between Aragon and Boromir during the "still sharp" scene with Narsil.
  • In the Council of Elrond, Boromir mentions his dream and reaches for the Ring. Gandalf recites the poem "One Ring to rule them all.." in black speech, causing the ground to shake and sun to go dark and provoking Elrond.
  • After the Council of Elrond, Aragorn visits his mother's grave and remembers Elrond telling him of his destiny. This is followed by another scene in which the company are sent off by Elrond and the elves.
  • Gandalf stops Frodo as they approach Moria to warn him about the Ring's power growing.
  • In the mines, Gandalf mentions mithril and lights up an old mithril mine. He notes the value of Bilbo's mithril shirt.
  • Additional fight scenes during the battle in the Chamber of the Marzabul.
  • Lothlorien is completely revised. The company are first on Haldir's left with the Elves distrusting Gimli and leery of Frodo.
  • Scene of the elves and the company approaching Caras Galadhon.
  • More dialog when Celeborn and Galadriel meet the company.
  • Sam recites a poem verse about Gandalf.
  • Galadriel acknowledges her possession of one of the elf-rings.
  • As the Fellowship leaves, Galadriel gives them each a personalized gift that will end up being critical to their future. Legolas gets a special bow, Sam gets some elven rope that comes in handy when he & Frodo make their way through the Emyn Muil, Frodo receives the Phial of Galadriel, and a touching moment occurs between Gimli and Galadriel.
  • Celeborn gives Aragorn a knife before they leave and warns them they are being tracked by something.
  • Boromir spots Gollum following the boats. Sam tries to get Frodo to eat or sleep. An exchange between Aragorn and Boromir about going to Minas Tirith before setting off for Mordor.
  • Extra action in the final battle.
  • An important extra line of dialog in Boromir's final scene.
  • 10-15 minutes of fan club credits during the final credits.


Soundtracks

Aníron
Composed and Performed by
Enya

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Adventure | Drama | Fantasy

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